Science Educati on for the 21st Ce ntury

Science Educati on for the 21st Ce ntury

Science Educati on for the 21st Ce ntury Using the insights of science to teach/learn science and most Carl Wieman UBC & CU Nobel Prize other subjects

Data!! Colorado physics & chem education research group: W. Adams, K. Perkins, K. Gray, L. Koch, J. Barbera, S. McKagan, N. Finkelstein, S. Pollock, R. Lemaster, S. Reid, C. Malley, M. Dubson... $$ NSF, Hewlett) The Vision Guided by research on learning All students much better educated. many benefits to society. Scientifically literate public Modern economy

Teaching more effective and more efficient and rewarding for the teacher. How to achieve? I. 2 models for teaching. II. Research on science learning a. Components of scientific expertise b. Measuring development of expertise c. Effective teaching and learning Science teaching Model 1 (I used for many years) think hard, figure out subject tell students how to

understand it give problem to solve yes done no students lazy or poorly prepared tell again Louder Model 1 (figure out and tell) Strengths & Weaknesses Works well for basic knowledge, prepared brain:

bad, avoid good, seek Easy to test. Effective feedback on results. See problems if learning: involves complex analysis or judgment organize large amount of information ability to learn new information and apply Complex learning-- different. Significantly changing the brain, not just

adding bits of knowledge. Growing neurons & building proteins enhance neuron connections, ... How to teach and measure this complex learning? Model 2 --scientific approach to science education Methods based on careful measurements of desired expert performance. Guided by research on learning. Iterate until achieve desired result. New opportunities for improving teaching.

Major advances past 1-2 decades Consistent picture Achieving learning brain research classroom studies cognitive psychology Some Data ( science from classrooms): Model 1 (telling) traditional lecture method

scientific teaching Retention of information from lecture 10% after 15 minutes >90 % after 2 days Fraction of concepts mastered in course 15-25% 50-70% with retention Perceptions of science-- what it is, how to learn, significantly less (5-10%) like scientist

more like scientist improves for future nonscientists and scientists Model 2-- scientific approach What has been learned? 1. Identifying components of expertise (thinking scientifically), and how expertise is developed. 2. How to measure components of science expertise. (and what traditional exams have been missing) 3. Components of effective teaching and learning. Expert competence research*

historians, scientists, chess players, doctors,... Expert competence = factual knowledge Organizational framework effective retrieval and application patterns, associations, scientific concepts or ? bility to monitor own thinking and learning o I understand this? How can I check?") New ways of thinking-- require MANY hours of intense practice with guidance/reflection. Change brain wiring

*Cambridge Handbook on Expertise and Expert Performanc Measuring conceptual mastery Force Concept Inventory- basic concepts of force and motion 1st semester physics Ask at start and end of semester-What % learned? (100s of courses) Average learned/course 16 traditional Lecture courses improved methods Fraction of unknown basic concepts learned

On average learn <30% of concepts did not already know Lecturer quality, class size, institution,...doesn't matter! Similar data for conceptual learning in other courses. R. Hake, A six-thousand-student survey AJP 66, 64-74 (98). Experts in science also have unique belief systems Novice Expert Content: isolated pieces of information to be memorized. Content: coherent structure

of concepts. Handed down by an authority. Unrelated to world. Describes nature, established by experiment. Problem solving: pattern matching to memorized recipes. Prob. Solving: Systematic concept-based strategies. Widely applicable.

*adapted from D. Hammer Measuring student perceptions about science Expert Novice Survey instruments-MPEX--1st yr physics, CLASS--physics, chem, bio tests ~40 statements, strongly agree to strongly disagree-Understanding physics basically means being able to recall something you've read or been shown. I do not expect physics equations to help my understanding of the ideas; they are just for doing calculations.

pre & post % shift? 5-10% intro physics more novice ref.s Redish et al, CU work--Adams, Perkins, MD, NF, SP, CW Intro Chemistry and biology just as bad! *adapted from D. Hammer Model 2-- scientific approach What has been learned? 1. Identifying components of expertise,

and how expertise developed. 2. How to measure components of science expertise. (and what traditional exams have been missing) 3. Components of effective teaching and learning. Components of effective teaching/learning apply to all levels, all settings 1. Motivation 2. Connect with and build on prior thinking 3. Apply what is known about memory 4. Explicit authentic practice of expert thinking. Extended & strenuous (brain development like muscle development)

Motivation-- essential (complex- depends on previous experiences, ...) Enhancing motivation to learn a. Relevant/useful/interesting to learner (meaningful context-- connect to what they know and value) b. Sense that can master subject and how to master c. Sense of personal control/choice Components of effective teaching/learning apply to all levels, all settings 1. Motivation 2. Connect with and build on prior thinking 3. Apply what is known about memory

a. short term limitations b. achieving long term retention (Bjork) 4. Explicit authentic practice of expert thinking. Extended & strenuous (brain development like muscle development) Limits on working memory--best established, most ignored result from cognitive science Working memory capacity VERY LIMITED! (remember & process <7 distinct new items) MUCH less than in typical science lecture

Mr Anderson, May I be excused? My brain is full. processing and retention from lecture tiny (for novice) many examples from research: Wieman and Perkins - test 15 minutes after told nonobvious fact in lecture. 10% remember Also true in technical talks! Curse of knowledge common teaching mistake step 1-- teach all the pieces of background knowledge and math procedures.

step 2-- give problem and show how pieces are put together to solve. Makes sense only if already know subject! For student, pieces are disconnected facts to memorize. Requires lots of working memory (and is boring). Better Approach: step 1-- present interesting problem step 2-- bring in facts and procedures as steps to solve. Builds expert connections and mental framework. Reduces working memory & more motivating. Components of effective teaching/learning apply to all levels, all settings 1. Motivation 2. Connect with and build on prior thinking

3. Apply what is known about memory 4. Explicit authentic practice of expert thinking. Extended & strenuous (brain development like muscle development) Practicing expert-like thinking-Challenging but doable tasks/questions Explicit focus on expert-like thinking concepts and mental models recognizing relevant & irrelevant information self-checking, sense making, & reflection Teacher provide effective feedback (timely and specific) Research shows time and effort not enough-- need to know what and how to practice. Good teacher is cognitive coach.

How to actually do in class? Hundreds of students??? a) proven practices from research b) use technology to help Example from a class--practicing expert thinking with effective guidance/feedback 1. Assignment--Read chapter on electric current. Learn basic facts and terminology. Short quiz to check/reward. 2. Class built around series of questions. When switch is closed, 1 bulb 2 will

a. stay same brightness, b. get brighter c. get dimmer, d. go out. 3. Individual answer with clicker (accountability, primed to learn) 3 (%) 2 A

B C D E 4. Discuss with consensus group, revote. (prof listen in!) 5. Elicit student reasoning. Show responses. Do experiment.-- simulation. show cck sim Follow up instructor discussion-review correct and incorrect thinking, extend ideas.

Respond to student questions & suggestions. (additional student learning) How practicing expert thinking-Challenging but doable question (difficult concept, prior thinking) Explicit focus on expert-like thinking actively developing concepts and mental models recognizing relevant & irrelevant information self-checking, sense making, & reflection Getting timely and specific feedback (peers, clicker histogram, instructor) Highly engaged-- exercising brain in optimum way good start, but not enough time in class! further practice-- well designed homework

Require expert thinking & feedback, long term retention Same approach and improved results physics for poets..... science graduate students same learning principles apply Some Data ( science from classrooms): Model 1 (telling) traditional lecture method scientific teaching Retention of information from lecture 10% after 15 minutes >90 % after 2 days

Fraction of concepts mastered in course 15-25% 50-70% with retention Perceptions of science-- what it is, how to learn, significantly less (5-10%) like scientist more like scientist improves for future nonscientists and scientists

How to get into every classroom? UBC CW Science Education Initiative and U. Col. SEI Changing educational culture in major research university science departments necessary first step for science education overall Departmental level scientific approach to teaching, all undergrad courses = learning goals, measures, tested best practices Dissemination and duplication. All materials, assessment tools, etc to be available on web Summary:

Scientific model for science education Much more effective. (and more fun) Good Refs.: NAS Press How people learn Redish, Teaching Physics (Phys. Ed. Res.) Handelsman, et al. Scientific Teaching Wieman, Change Magazine-Oct. 07 at www.carnegiefoundation.org/change/ CLASS belief survey: CLASS.colorado.edu phet simulations: phet.colorado.edu cwsei.ubc.ca-- resources, Guide to effective use of clickers

extra unused slides below Science teaching Model 2. prior research Goals. What students will be able to do. (solve, design, analyze, capacity to learn,...) Create activities and feedback prior research targeting desired expertise.

Use, and measure results. yes done modify no why? goals unrealistic wrong treatment Is model for doing science

prior research Goals. Question to be answered. What data will answer it. prior Design and build experiment. research Run and measure results. yes done modify

no why? goals unrealistic wrong experiment Model 2 --scientific approach to science education prior research prior research Goals. What students will be able to do.

(solve, design, analyze, learn,...) Create activities and feedback targeting desired expertise. Run and measure results. yes done modif y no why? goals

unrealistic wrong treatment New opportunities for improving teaching. clickers*-Not automatically helpful-give accountability, anonymity, fast response Used/perceived as expensive attendance and testing device little benefit, student resentment. Used/perceived to enhance engagement, communication, and learning transformative challenging questions-- concepts student-student discussion (peer instruction) & responses (learning and feedback)

follow up instructor discussion- timely specific feedback minimal but nonzero grade impact *An instructor's guide to the effective use of personal response systems ("clickers") in teaching-- www.cwsei.ubc.ca how to cover as much material? transfer information gathering outside of class IV. Institutionalizing improved research-based teaching practices. (From bloodletting to antibiotics) Univ. of Brit. Col. CW Science Education Initiative (CWSEI.ubc.ca) & Univ. of Col. Sci. Ed. Init. Departmental level, widespread sustained change

at major research universities scientific approach to teaching, all undergrad courses Departments selected competitively Substantial one-time $$$ and guidance Extensive development of educational materials, assessment tools, data, etc. Available on web. Visitors program Characteristics of expert tutors* (Which can be duplicated in classroom?) Motivation major focus (context, pique curiosity,...) Never praise person-- limited praise, all for process Understands what students do and do not know. timely, specific, interactive feedback Almost never tell students anything-- pose questions.

Mostly students answering questions and explaining. Asking right questions so students challenged but can figure out. Systematic progression. Let students make mistakes, then discover and fix. Require reflection: how solved, explain, generalize, etc. *Lepper and Woolverton pg 135 in Improving Academic Perfoman Implications for instruction Student beliefs about science and science problem solving important! Beliefs content learning Beliefs -- powerful filter choice of major & retention

Teaching practices students beliefs typical significant decline (phys and chem) (and less interest) Avoid decline if explicitly address beliefs. Why is this worth learning? How does it connect to real world? How connects to things student knows/makes sense? Data 2. Conceptual understanding in traditional course electricity 1

Eric Mazur (Harvard Univ.) End of course. 70% can calculate currents and voltages in this circuit. only 40% correctly predict change in brightness of bulbs when switch closed! 8V A 12 V 2

1 B Developing expertise-- transforming brain Think about and use science like a scientist. What does that mean? How is it accomplished?

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