Section B - Writing for different audiences and purposes

Section B - Writing for different audiences and purposes

Discover about Character: Effect of language: for even in the houses the fog began to lie thickly; and there, close up to the warmth, sat Dr. Jekyll, looking deathly sick. He did not rise to meet his visitor, but held out a cold hand and bade him welcome in a changed voice. Other similar moments? Which theme? What do we learn? 1 Jekyll and Hyde Revision Plot Session Objectives 1. To revise the key elements of the plot. 2. To link moments in the plot to themes, characters , context and audience

reactions. 2 Mr Enfield Mr Utterson Mr Hyde A) Character Poole Dr Lanyon Dr Jekyll B) The effect of language For example

Terrifying Confusing Mysterious Sympathetic Ironic/hypocritical Tense C) Themes Mystery Secrets Horror/Violence Fear The supernatural Dualism Appearance Society

Morality Science Context Stevenson His family included scientists, religious ministers and philosophy professors. The notorious Jack the Ripper murders occurred in London in 1888. There was discussion about the murderer being highly educated, or even of royal birth. Stevenson was a sickly child (he had serious lung problems) who read a great deal about travel and adventure. A combination of his love of adventure and ill health led him to spend many years as a writer travelling the world in search of a

climate that was healthier than Britain's. Reputation was a important factor in Victorian society. You social status and how well you were respected depended on how you conducted yourself. Many people in Victorian society saw science and a belief in religion and the supernatural as being at odds with each another. A lot felt they had to choose between the two. And many believed that science had become dangerous and was meddling in matters which only God had control over. In 1859 Charles Darwin published The Origin of Species. This book became famous for introducing the Theory of Evolution to the public. Many people saw

it as an attack on religion, because the book made it impossible to believe that God created the world in seven days. Historians now regard the Victorian era as a time of hypocrisy, due to an outward appearance of dignity and restraint together with prostitution and drug addiction. Even a Victorian contemporary, Ruskin, stated that the Victorians were remarkable hypocrites. This hypocrisy stemmed from the social expectations of the time, which were exceedingly high, one of which the intense desire to be a model Christian. Chapter 1 Story of the door Plot summary - Utterson and Enfield go for their walk. - Enfield tells a story of a horrible man colliding with an 8 year old girl and trampling on her. - Enfield apprehends the man who offers to pay a large sum of money to the girls family. - Hyde goes into a strange door with the use of

a key and comes back with cash and a cheque, which turns out to be genuine. - Enfield reiterates how disturbing Hyde was. - Utterson keeps asking questions despite saying they should mind their own business. - They agree to never talk about it again. What do we discover about character? Effects on the reader: Themes + Significance: Context: 7 Chapter 2 Search for Mr Hyde Plot summary - Utterson checks Jekylls will and notes that all his possessions will pass to Hyde. This troubles

the lawyer greatly. - Utterson visits Lanyon who says Jekyll has become too extreme in his views. Lanyon has never heard of Hyde. Utterson returns and has a nightmare about Hyde. - Utterson spends day and night watching the strange door. - Eventually Hyde arrives and Utterson introduces himself. - Hyde is defensive and confrontational and wants to know how Utterson knows him. - Utterson gets a look at Hyde before he disappears behind the door. - Utterson is in shock and immediately feels a loathing for Hyde. - He is convinced that Hyde is trouble and vows to warn Jekyll. What do we discover about character?

Effects on the reader: Themes + Significance: Context: 8 Chapter 3 Dr Jekyll seemed quite at ease Plot summary - A few weeks later Jekyll olds a dinner part and Utterson is the last guest to leave. - Jekyll likes Utterson and his calm demeanour. - Jekyll is a large man, about 50 and is in a good mood until Utterson brings up his will. - Jekyll tells Utterson to relax and not to be so anxious like Lanyon. - Jekyll goes on to call Lanyon old-fashioned and too ignorant. - Jekyll is taken aback when Utterson mentions Hyde but insists that his bond with Hyde wont

be broken. - He states that he can be rid of Hyde any moment he chooses - He asks Utterson to promise that he will ensure that Hyde receives what is entitled to him. Utterson reluctantly promises. What do we discover about character? Effects on the reader: Themes + Significance: Context: 9 Chapter 4 The Carew murder case Plot summary - A year later a maid witnesses Hyde clubbing Sir Danvers Carew to death. The attack is

brutal and unprovoked. The maid then faints. - The police notify Utterson who identifies the body. The murder becomes big news in London. - Utterson recognises the murder weapon as half the walking stick he gave Jekyll as a present. He leads the police to Hydes apartment, which is in a dismal part of London. - They Search Hydes apartment, which is a mess but does have tasteful furniture and artwork. - They realise that finding Hyde will be difficult because he has no friends, family or anyone who has seen him more than twice. What do we discover about character? Effects on the reader: Themes + Significance:

Context: 10 Chapter 5 The incident of the letter Plot summary - Utterson goes to Jekylls house and finds him in his lab looking very ill. - Utterson talks about the murder and asks about Hyde. Jekyll says he will never see Hyde again. - Jekyll gives Utterson a note from Hyde. The note states that Jekyll isnt to blame but it has not envelope or date. - Utterson asks Poole about the note. Apparently no messenger delivered the note, meaning that Hyde must have access to the laboratory. - Utterson visits Mr. Guest, a handwriting expert. He compares Hydes note and Jekylls

invitation. Guest notes how similar the handwriting is, with the only difference being how the letters are sloped. - Utterson thinks Jekyll has forged the note. What do we discover about character? Effects on the reader: Themes + Significance: Context: 11 Chapter 6 Remarkable incident of Dr Lanyon Plot summary - Hyde has disappeared and Jekyll has returned to good health and starts having dinner parties again. - For 2 months Dr Jekyll is happy and friendly

but in January Poole starts turning Utterson away again. - Utterson visits Lanyon and finds him dying. He seems to be dying of shock and when Utterson mentions Jekyll Lanyon becomes angry and distressed, he wants nothing to do with Jekyll. - Utterson gets a letter from Jekyll stating that he plans to live a life of solitude. - 3 weeks later Lanyon dies and Utterson receives an envelope. It instructs Utterson not to open it until the death of Jekyll. - Utterson returns to Jekylls but is refused entry again. What do we discover about character? Effects on the reader: Themes + Significance: Context:

12 Chapter 7 Incident at the window Plot summary - Utterson and Enfield are taking their Sunday walk when they pass the strange door and walk into the courtyard where they see one window open. - At the window is Jekyll looking and sounding terrible. - Jekyll says he cant join the men for a walk and he talks about how low he is feeling. - Suddenly Jekylls features convulse and change and a horrible expression comes on his face. - He quickly shuts the window and Utterson and Enfield leave in shock, trying to come to terms with what they have seen. What do we discover about character?

Effects on the reader: Themes + Significance: Context: 13 Chapter 8 The last night Plot summary - - - - - Utterson is sitting peacefully after dinner when Poole

rushes to see him,. The butler is in a panic about Jekylls health and behaviour. They travel to Jekylls through the wild and cold March night. When they get there the house servants are all very disturbed. Utterson and Poole go to the laboratory but a strange voice says that Jekyll will see no one. Poole then tells Utterson that they havent seen Jekyll for a week. They have heard cries and strange footsteps. Poole had received notes from under the door instructing to go to all the chemists in London. The product he brings back is called not pure by further notes under the door. Poole then tells Utterson that he saw Hyde, Utterson thinks Jekyll has been murdered. Utterson plans to knock the door down, a voice ask for mercy but Utterson continues. When they enter they find Hydes dead body in large clothes. They search the cabinet for Jekyll but cant find him. Utterson finds Jekylls new will which now leaves everything to Utterson. He also finds a note dated

that day that asks Utterson to read Lanyons account first then Jekylls confession. What do we discover about character? Effects on the reader: Themes + Significance: Context: 14 Chapter 9 Doctor Lanyons Narrative Plot summary - - -

- Lanyon receives a letter from Jekyll asking him for help. Jekyll wants Utterson to visit his lab and take a draw full of equipment and powders. A man will collect the draw at Midnight. Lanyon is confused and worried about Jekyll but he does as he is asked. He gets a gun ready and waits for midnight. Lanyon meets Hyde and is shocked by his appearance (he is wearing clothes too big for him). Hyde eagerly mixes the potion and asks Lanyon if he wants to see the results. Lanyon is too curious and stays to watch the transformation. Lanyon sees Hyde melt away and Jekyll appear. Lanyon talks to Jekyll for the next hour and is so sickened by Jekylls actions that he feels like he wont live much longer. What do we discover about character?

Effects on the reader: Themes + Significance: Context: 15 Chapter 10 Jekylls full statement Plot summary - - - - - -

Jekyll describes his background. He came from a wealthy family and got a good education. He was guaranteed a distinguished future. He explains that his weakness was that he liked to enjoy himself too much and he liked to do things that werent proper for a gentleman. He vowed to hide this side of his personality. His scientific studies began to focus on duality and trying to separate two sides of a persons character. Jekyll wants to be able to indulge his darker side without losing his reputation. He discovers a drug that can isolate the darker side of his personality in physical form. The first transformation was painful but after he felt younger and happier. His realises that physically he is more stunted and ugly. Once he changes back to Jekyll he makes Hyde his benefactor. He then lives a life of sin as Hyde without guilt. Jekyll begins to lose control of Hyde and he changes into Hyde without the potion. Hyde is taking over. This makes Jekyll stop changing into Hyde. Jekyll lives a very reserved life for 2 months but he cant control

the urge and he changes into Hyde. Hyde is far more intense and kills Sir Danvers Carew. Jekyll changes back then destroys Hyde's key and tries to get rid of Hyde. However in Regents park he changes into Hyde and then has to get Lanyon to help him. Hyde begins to take control and Jekyll gives up trying to make a new potion. He writes a note for Utterson and Henry Jekyll dies. What do we discover about character? Effects on the reader: Themes + Significance: Context: 16 Extract bank Chapter 1 Page:

First line: Last line: A) Character = B) Effect of language to describe = C) Theme = D) Where else = 17 Extract bank Chapter 2 Page: First line: Last line: A) Character = B) Effect of language to describe = C) Theme = D) Where else = 18 Extract bank Chapter 3

Page: First line: Last line: A) Character = B) Effect of language to describe = C) Theme = D) Where else = 19 Extract bank Chapter 4 Page: First line: Last line: A) Character = B) Effect of language to describe = C) Theme = D) Where else = 20 Extract bank

Chapter 5 Page: First line: Last line: A) Character = B) Effect of language to describe = C) Theme = D) Where else = 21 Extract bank Chapter 6 Page: First line: Last line: A) Character = B) Effect of language to describe = C) Theme = D) Where else = 22

Extract bank Chapter 7 Page: First line: Last line: A) Character = B) Effect of language to describe = C) Theme = D) Where else = 23 Extract bank Chapter 8 Page: First line: Last line: A) Character = B) Effect of language to describe = C) Theme = D) Where else = 24

Extract bank Chapter 9 Page: First line: Last line: A) Character = B) Effect of language to describe = C) Theme = D) Where else = 25 Extract bank Chapter 10 Page: First line: Last line: A) Character = B) Effect of language to describe = C) Theme = D) Where else =

26 Jekyll and Hyde Question A - Character A) From this extract what do you discover about the character of 8 marks 10 minutes Point(s) about the character Quote to support Comment on the quote Reader reaction Context (if possible) 27 Jekyll and Hyde Question B Language B) Comment on the use of language used to present 10 marks 15 minutes Point(s) about how the language effects the reader and why it has this effect. Quote to support Identify feature + Comment on the quote Language lift Reader reaction (If different) Context (if possible)

28 Jekyll and Hyde Question C - Theme C) Explore the significance of ________ in the extract 10 marks 15 minutes Point(s) about the key moment in the extract for the theme and why it is significant. Quote to support Comment on the quote Language lift Reader reaction or What the reader learns about the theme. Context (if possible) 29 Jekyll and Hyde Question D - Theme D) Explore the significance of ________ in the one other part of the novel 12 marks 20 minutes Introduce your extract first description, chapter and page number. Point(s) about the key moment in the extract for the theme and why it is significant. Quote to support Comment on the quote Language lift

Reader reaction or What the reader learns about the theme. Context (if possible) 30

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