Race, Rights, and the Constitution: the nineteenth century

Race, Rights, and the Constitution: the nineteenth century

The First Amendment: freedom of speech and press N O R T H E R N N E VA D A T E A C H I N G A M E R I C A N H I ST ORY P R OJ EC T F E B R UA RY 2 0 1 2 Reading the First Amendment Congress shall make no law Reading the First Amendment Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion,

Reading the First Amendment Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; Reading the First Amendment Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech,

Reading the First Amendment Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press, Reading the First Amendment Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech,

or of the press, or of the right of the people peaceably to assemble, Reading the First Amendment Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press, or of the right of the people peaceably to assemble,

and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances. Sources of the First Amendment Handout: new state constitutions, 1776-1784 Which part of the First Amendment gets the most attention? (Why?) Sources of the First Amendment Handout: new state constitutions, 1776-1784 Which part of the First Amendment gets the most attention? (Why?)

Which gets the least? (Where is freedom of speech?) Sources of the First Amendment Historian Leonard W. Levy, Emergence of a Free Press: The phrase freedom of speech originated in Anglo-American history during the struggle of Parliament to achieve the privilege of free debate, and in that sense it has a history separate from the history of free speech as a civil liberty. Until the last quarter of the eighteenth century, freedom of speech referred not to a civil right but primarily to a parliamentary right: the legislators immunity from punishment for anything said by him in his official capacity during a legislative session. The citizens personal right of freedom of speech evolved as an offshoot

of freedom of the press and of freedom of religionthe freedom to speak openly on religious matters. of the original thirteen states only Pennsylvania acted to protect free speech. The First Amendments guarantee that freedom of speech shall not be abridged was therefore almost without precedent. Sources of the First Amendment Handout: new state constitutions, 1776-1784 Which part of the First Amendment gets the most attention? (Why?) Which gets the least? (Where is freedom of speech?) English common law on freedom of the

press Freedom from prior restraint But NOT freedom from prosecution for what one publishes, under the law of seditious libel (actually 4 classes of libelblasphemous, obscene, private, and seditious) Sources of the First Amendment

Blackstone on freedom of the press: The liberty of the press is indeed essential to the nature of a free state; but this consists in laying no previous restraints upon publications, and not in freedom from censure for criminal matter when published. Every freeman has an undoubted right to lay what sentiments he pleases before the public: to forbid this is to destroy the freedom of the press: but if he publishes what is improper, mischievous, or illegal, he must take the consequences of his own temerity. Thus the will of individuals is still left free; the abuse only of that freewill is the object of legal punishment. Sources of the First Amendment

Blackstone on freedom of the press: The liberty of the press is indeed essential to the nature of a free state; but this consists in laying no previous restraints upon publications, and not in freedom from censure for criminal matter when published. Every freeman has an undoubted right to lay what sentiments he pleases before the public: to forbid this is to destroy the freedom of the press: but if he publishes what is improper, mischievous, or illegal, he must take the consequences of his own temerity. Thus the will of individuals is still left free; the abuse only of that free-will is the object of legal punishment. NOTE: The First Amendment did NOT reflect its framers rejection of seditious libel doctrine. Nor did it immediately change

peoples definitions of freedom of the press. The Sedition Act, 1798 In the 1790s in Britain and (to a lesser extent) America: seeds of a libertarian argument for freedom of the press Sedition Act: passed by Federalist Congress, signed by Federalist President Adams (Major Problems pp. 87-88)but note that even this act incorporated some new ideas (requirement to show criminal intent; criminalization of false, scandalous and malicious writing or writings) Enforcement: 14 people arrested, 10 convicted

Response to Sedition Act: Virginia and Kentucky Resolutions issue was as much federalism as freedom of the press 19th-century developments Not a single Supreme Court case dealing with First Amendment freedom of speech 19th-century developments Not a single Supreme Court case dealing with First Amendment freedom of speech

Civil War: opposition press remains free to challenge Lincoln administrationthough the military could suppress distribution of newspapers opposed to governmental authority (typically in occupied parts of the South; outcry and reversal when practiced in the North) 19th-century developments Censorship (Victorian morality)

Punishments for blasphemy (pre-Civil War) and for disturbing the peace by publicly blaspheming God or religion (post-CW) Anti-vice movement of the late 19th century: 1873 federal Comstock law (Anthony Comstock) makes it illegal to import, transport, or mail pornography or any article of indecent or immoral nature, or any article of medicine for causing abortion Numerous state little Comstock laws follow, criminalizing production and sale of such materials

1914: Margaret Sanger indicted under the Comstock law for advertising birth control in her magazine (charges dropped; indicted in 1917 for opening birth-control clinic) 19th-century developmentsand into the 20th The Bad Tendency test: Part of the general 19c movement toward censorship Does the speech in question have the tendency to cause illegal action? If so, then the speech can be prosecuted (under

English common law of libel) 19th-century developmentsand into the 20th The Bad Tendency test: Part of the general 19c movement toward censorship Does the speech in question have the tendency to cause illegal action? If so, then the speech can be prosecuted (under English common law of libel)

Two Supreme Court decisions written by Oliver Wendell Holmes: Patterson v. Colorado (1907)regarding newspaper criticism of judicial behavior in pending cases Fox v. Washington (1915): upholds state statute defining as misdemeanor the publishing of written matter having a tendency to encourage or incite the commission of any crime, breach of the peace or act of violence

The Great War (later called WWI) Expansion of government authority: Congress passes draft law; authorizes President to regulate and/or take control of RRs & communication, prevent strikes, operate factories producing war material, issue rules governing food sales and prices, etc. (Note: in some ways, these expansions follow upon Progressive ideas about governmental action. But they also expand national

government power extensively.) Similar expansion in the realm of press and speech alien enemy regulations declared by President Wilson, 1917 (MP pp. 313-14) Espionage Act, 1917 (amended 1918, MP pp. 314-15) Schenck v. United States, 1919: close reading (MP pp. 315-

316) A few key points about Schenck v. U.S. It was one of three 1919 cases on the Espionage Act: the others were Frohwerk v. United States and Debs v. United States. In all three, Justice Holmes applied the Bad Tendency testwhich he called a principle too well established and too manifestly good sense to need citation of the books.

A few key points about Schenck v. U.S. It was one of three 1919 cases on the Espionage Act: the others were Frohwerk v. United States and Debs v. United States. In all three, Justice Holmes applied the Bad Tendency testwhich he called a principle too well established and too manifestly good sense to need citation of the books. These cases would mobilize a constituency for civil liberties (the organization later called the ACLU).

The Court would continue to use this test through the 1920s but Holmes would change his view. From Schenck to Abrams (1919) and Gitlow (1925) Abrams v. United States: what are the key issues (from your close analysis)? Of the majority opinion (by Justice Clarke) Of the dissent (by Justice Holmes)

From Schenck to Abrams (1919) and Gitlow (1925) Abrams v. United States: what are the key issues (from your close analysis)? Of the majority opinion (by Justice Clarke) Of the dissent (by Justice Holmes) Gitlow v. New York: what are the key issues?

Of the majority opinion (by Justice Sanford) Of the dissent (by Justice Holmes) From Schenck to Abrams (1919) and Gitlow (1925) Abrams v. United States: what are the key issues (from your close analysis)? Of the majority opinion (by Justice Clarke) Of the dissent (by Justice Holmes)

Gitlow v. New York: what are the key issues? Of the majority opinion (by Justice Sanford) Of the dissent (by Justice Holmes) Note: Gitlow also incorporates the freedom of speech clause of the First Amendment, to apply to states (using the due process clause of the Fourteenth Amendment) From Schenck to Abrams (1919) and Gitlow (1925) Abrams v. United States: what are the key issues (from your close analysis)?

Of the majority opinion (by Justice Clarke) Of the dissent (by Justice Holmes) Gitlow v. New York: what are the key issues? Of the majority opinion (by Justice Sanford) Of the dissent (by Justice Holmes) Note: Gitlow also incorporates the freedom of speech clause of the First Amendment, to apply to states (using the due process clause of the Fourteenth Amendment)

How has Holmess view changed since Schenck? Thoughts about why his view now differed from before? Three tests for free speech cases Bad Tendency test (19th century, used in Schenck and in majority opinions in Abrams and Gitlow) Three tests for free speech cases Bad Tendency test (19th century, used in Schenck

and in majority opinions in Abrams and Gitlow) Clear and Present Danger test term appears in Holmess majority opinion in Schenck but hes still in the Bad Tendency vein then becomes more distinct from Bad Tendency in his dissents

in Abrams and Gitlow becomes the Courts major test in free speech cases in mid20th century Three tests for free speech cases Bad Tendency test (19th century, used in Schenck and in majority opinions in Abrams and Gitlow) Clear and Present Danger test

term appears in Holmess majority opinion in Schenck but hes still in the Bad Tendency vein then becomes more distinct from Bad Tendency in his dissents in Abrams and Gitlow becomes the Courts major test in free speech cases in mid20th century Imminent Lawless Action test replaces it, in Brandenburg v. Ohio (1969)

Government may only limit speech that incites unlawful action sooner than police can arrive to prevent the action. Thought Exercise: Creating a First Amendment Case Study for 2012 The First Amendment in todays world Defining speech (what is speech? where is speech?) Whats the press (not just newspapers and printing presses) New meanings of assembly (in a world of Facebook and Occupy Wall Street)

Thought Exercise: Creating a First Amendment Case Study for 2012 The First Amendment in todays world Defining speech (what is speech? where is speech?) Whats the press (not just newspapers and printing presses) New meanings of assembly (in a world of Facebook and Occupy Wall Street) The contexts we live in (or live with)

Perpetual war? (and war undeclared by Congress) The guidance and challenges provided by precedent (earlier laws, Supreme Court decisions, etc.) Last thoughts or questions?

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