Pathway 1: Sign Up For Mastering Chemistry http://www.pearsonmylabandmastering.com/

Pathway 1: Sign Up For Mastering Chemistry http://www.pearsonmylabandmastering.com/

Pathway 1: Sign Up For Mastering Chemistry http://www.pearsonmylabandmastering.com/ northamerica/masteringchemistry/ To access learning system Instructions are also available on Blackboard 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. Pathway 2:

Access Course Through FSCJ Blackboard https://connections.fscj.edu/sites/connections/ welcome/Pages/default.aspx?ReturnUrl= %2f_layouts%2f15%2fAuthenticate.aspx%3fSource %3d%252F&Source=%2F John Taylor Florida State College @ Jacksonville [email protected] 2014 Pearson Education, Inc.

Pathway 3: Sign Up For Conceptual Academy http:// www.conceptualacademy.co m/node/42251 Academy Review: http://cathyduffyreviews.com/ science/conceptual-chemistry.htm 2014 Pearson Education, Inc.

John Suchocki Saint Michaels College Colchester, VT (Burlington suburb) And John Taylor Florida State College @ Jacksonville Lecture Presentation Chapter 1 About Science Bradley Sieve Northern Kentucky University

Highland Heights, KY Modified by 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. John Taylor Florida State College @ Jacksonville 1.1 Science Is a Way of Understanding the Natural World Science is More than a body of knowledge A method for exploring nature

Science is the product of Observations Common sense Rational thinking Experimentation Brilliant insights 2014 Pearson Education, Inc.

1.1 Science Is a Way of Understanding the Natural World Modern science began when People became skeptical of observations Wondered is explanations were accurate Turned to experimentation instead of simple observations Watch the Video #CO101a (2:27 minutes): http://www.conceptualacademy.com/course/conceptual-chemistry/ 11-science-way-understanding-natural-world 2014 Pearson Education, Inc.

1.1 Science Is a Way of Understanding the Natural World 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. 1.1 Science Is a Way of Understanding the Natural World Experiments are better when proven wrong than right Wrong experiments cause us to doublecheck our thinking Revising ideas moves us closer to the correct explanation but may not be perfect

2014 Pearson Education, Inc. 1.1 Science Is a Way of Understanding the Natural World Essential activities conducted by scientists 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. 1.2 The Discovery of the Buckyball Discovered by Kroto, Smalley, and Curl How can one identify the composition of interstellar dust? How can one tackle such a question? Watch the Video #CO102a (11:13 minute)

(Meet Kai & Maile via Interview with Bill Baker) http://www.conceptualacademy.com/course/conceptual-chemistry/12discovery-buckyball 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. 1.2 The Discovery of the Buckyball The Wheel of Scientific Inquiry How was the wheel used in this case? 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. 1.2 The Discovery of the Buckyball Kroto, Curl, and Smalley received the Noble Prize for their work

2014 Pearson Education, Inc. Concept Check Kroto, Smalley, and Curl won the Nobel Prize for a. identifying the composition of interstellar dust. b. producing buckminsterfullerene. c. understanding the implications of a chance discovery. d. doing all of the above. 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. Concept Check

The answer is c: Their most significant achievement was being open and curious enough to explore their chance discovery and then to understand its implications. 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. 1.3 Technology Is Applied Science Project #14 (Chapter 12 Hydrocarbons) Watch the Nat Geo Film; record Notes; Summarize with one page paper with your impressions-see WORD .doc file Download: http://www.northcampus.net/chm1020/projects/WorldWithoutOilProject14.doc View: http://www.northcampus.net/chm1020/projects/WorldWithoutOilProject14.htm

National Geographic Aftermath Series: World Without Oil What would our world look like if we ran out of oil? The lifeblood of our hightech, highly mobile world won't last forever. Watch one scenario of what happens when one day oil does run out. How might our world change and how would we adapt? Aftermath follows the chaotic days and months after this catastrophic event through dramatic re-creations and CGI animation. Find out how we might cope as food disappears, electrical power fails and winter turns the big cities into abandoned buildings.

U-Tube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S56y0AzwdVk Before it is too late Can Technology Save Us? 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. 1.3 Technology Is Applied Science Technology is applied science Scientific discoveries can lead to technology Applications of nanotube Technology can lead to scientific discoveries

Use of computers in science Although different, technology and science are very much related 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. 1.3 Technology Is Applied Science Technology is a double-edged sword Consider technology for fossil fuels Beneficial Extracts fossil fuels for use Produces energy

Detrimental Creates pollution Depletes resources 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. 1.3 Technology Is Applied Science Technology is also offering other options Sustainable energy sources

Photovoltaics (Chapter 17) Hydroelectric (Chapter 17) Wind (Chapter 17) Solar thermal (Chapter 17) Technology is simply a tool Can be used for good or bad 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. 1.3 Technology Is Applied Science Risk Assessment Weighing the benefits of technology against the drawbacks

Risks and benefits will very from person to person Leading to great public debates Irradiated food Medication labels Risks may not be immediately known 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. Concept Check Does technology come from science, or does science come from technology?

2014 Pearson Education, Inc. Concept Check Both! The practical application of knowledge gained through science is technology. In this sense, the science comes first. The tools of technology, however, can be used by scientists to further their understandings of nature. 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. 1.4 We Are Still Learning About the Natural World Science is a work in progress

Watch Video#104a (13:21 Minutes): http://www.conceptualacademy.com/course/conceptualchemistry/14-we-are-still-learning-about-natural-world For all we know, much more is unknown A fact is something agreed upon by competent observers Even accepted facts change over time 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. 1.4 We Are Still Learning About the Natural World Hypothesis Suggested explanation for an observed

phenomenon Scientific hypothesis is only scientific when it can be tested through experiments The more supporting experiments there are, the more confidence scientists have Just one failed experiment and the hypothesis is discredited 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. Concept Check Which statement is a scientific hypothesis? 1. The moon is made of Swiss cheese. 2. Human consciousness arises from

an essence that is undetectable. 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. Concept Check Both statements attempt to explain observed phenomena, so both are hypotheses. Only statement (a) is testable, however; therefore, only statement (a) is a scientific hypothesis. 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. 1.4 We Are Still Learning About the Natural World

Scientific Law Also known as a scientific principle Hypothesis that has been tested and supported over and over In practice is the best approximation that has been thoroughly tested Law of Mass Conservation is an example 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. 1.4 We Are Still Learning About the Natural World Scientific Theory A well-tested scientific explanation

Examples include Theory of relativity Theory of the atom Theories constantly evolve and are the foundation of science 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. 1.4 We Are Still Learning About the Natural World Take Scientific Method Vocabulary Test on Blackboard 2014 Pearson Education, Inc.

1.4 We Are Still Learning About the Natural World Why should we learn science? Is part of our everyday life Transportation, agriculture, medicine, materials Provides an understanding of our place on this planet Consumption of resources Pollution of the planet By understanding science, we can move toward sustainable living

2014 Pearson Education, Inc. 1.4 We Are Still Learning About the Natural World-Scientific Method Project Project #1: The Scientific Method & Controlled Experiment Paper/Project: Conceptual Chemistry 5th Edition by John Suchocki Scientific Observations Assignment: Our syllabus includes the FSCJ CHM 1020 Nine Section Learning Outcomes & Assessments. Section #6 of this district course outline model has the following: Outcome #3. Demonstrate knowledge of Scientific Method by a. Formulate problem, b. Make observations,

c. Derive and test hypothesis and d. Make conclusions. Each science course at FSCJ has this learning outcome. The district science council has defined that all science classes at FSCJ will accomplish this outcome via one of two methods: 1. Analyze an experiment that demonstrates the use of the scientific method 2. Analyze an article in a scientific journal where the scientific method is used So instead of performing an experiment or looking at an article for this course, we will watch an old Sci-fi Hollywood movie which demonstrates the scientific method in use. The film may be boring today by today standards as it is not an action thriller and spends too much time on the scientific method. See the film review on the next slide: 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. 1.4 We Are Still Learning About the Natural

World-Scientific Method Project Movie Film: Andromeda Strain 1971

Amazon.com Editorial Review: The best-selling novel by Michael Crichton was faithfully adapted for this taut 1971 thriller, about a team of scientists racing against time to destroy a deadly alien virus that threatens to wipe out life on Earth. As usual with any Crichton-based movie, the emphasis is on an exciting clash between nature and science, beginning when virologists discover the outer-space virus in a tiny town full of corpses. Projecting total contamination, the scientists isolate the deadly strain in a massive, high-tech underground lab facility, which is rigged for nuclear destruction if the virus is not successfully controlled. The movie spends a great deal of time covering the scientific procedures of the high-pressure investigation, and the rising tensions between scientists who have been forced to work in claustrophobic conditions. It's all very fascinating if you're interested in scientific method and technological advances, although the film is obviously dated in many of its details. It's more effective as a thriller in which tension is derived not only from the deadly threat of the virus, but from the escalating fear and anxiety among the small group of people who've been assigned to save the human race. The basic premise is still captivating; it's easy to see how this

became the foundation of Crichton's science-thriller empire. --Jeff Shannon Scientific Observations Assignment: Of the 70 points project/paper/activity portion of the course, this project counts 10 points: 1. 5 points for watching and taking notes during the movie (2 Hr 8 min) and 2. 5 points for completing the required district question form and writing an analysis of the film via a. Define the Problem b. Describe the procedures used to allow the scientists access to the facility call Wildfire c. Describe examples of the use of the scientific method through experimentation d. Describe the chemistry principles discovered to solve the problem.(Section 10.3 Chapter 10) This film is available on Netflix, North Campus Library, some public libraries. It is for sale cheap on amazon.com or you can check out one of my copies if you visit me on campus on Mondays beginning June 6 2014 Pearson Education, Inc.

1.5 Chemistry Is Integral to Our lives Chemistry is the study of matter and the transformations it can undergo Matter is anything that occupies space Stuff that makes up all material things Consider how broad the scope of chemistry must be 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. 1.5 Chemistry Is Integral to Our lives Chemistry is often described as a central science

2014 Pearson Education, Inc. 1.5 Chemistry Is Integral to Our lives Progress is made by conducting research Basic Research Research leading to a greater understanding In chemistry, describes how atoms combine Applied Research Focuses on the development of useful applications Most chemists deal with applied research These types of research rely on each other

2014 Pearson Education, Inc. 1.5 Chemistry Is Integral to Our lives Examples of Applied Research 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. 1.5 Chemistry Is Integral to Our lives Waste materials have long been disposed of without thought for the long-term consequences. Green chemistry can be utilized to Minimize waste

Recycle waste Reuse waste materials Render waste materials safe 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. 1.5 Chemistry Is Integral to Our lives Optional Video: How Chemist Communicate via ACS Meeting (American Chemical Society) John Visits an ACS National Meeting: Video # CO105a (5:26 minutes) http://www.conceptualacademy.com/course/conceptual-chemistry/15-chemistryintegral-our-lives

2014 Pearson Education, Inc. Concept Check Chemists have learned how to produce aspirin using petroleum as a starting material. Is this an example of basic or applied research? 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. Concept Check This is an example of applied research, because the primary goal was to develop a useful commodity. However, the ability to produce aspirin

from petroleum depended on an understanding of atoms and molecules developed from many years of basic research. 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. 1.6 Scientists Measure Physical Quantities Significant Figures Each number in a properly recorded measurement is a significant digit (or significant figure). Significant digits express the uncertainty in the measurement. When you count significant digits, start

counting with the first nonzero number. Lets look at a reaction measured by three stopwatches. 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. 1.6 Scientists Measure Physical Quantities Scientific Notation-Exponents Exponents are used to indicate that a number has been multiplied by itself. Exponents are written using a superscript; thus, (4)(4)(4) = 43. The number 3 is an exponent and indicates that the number 4 is multiplied by itself three times. It is read 4 to the third power or 4

cubed. (4)(4)(4) = 43 = 64 . 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. 1.6 Scientists Measure Physical Quantities Scientific Notation-Powers of 10 A power of 10 is a number that results when 10 is raised to an exponential power. The power can be: positive (number greater than 1) or negative (number less than 1). 2014 Pearson Education, Inc.

1.6 Scientists Measure Physical Quantities Scientific Notation Numbers in science are often very large or very small. To avoid confusion, we use scientific notation. Scientific notation utilizes the significant digits in a measurement followed by a power of 10. The significant digits are expressed as a number between 1 and 10. Watch Video # CO106b (7:31 Minutes) http://www.conceptualacademy.com/course/conceptual-chemistry/ 16-scientists-measure-physical-quantities 2014 Pearson Education, Inc.

1.6 Scientists Measure Physical Quantities Scientific Notation-Example There are 26,800,000,000,000,000,000,000 helium atoms in 1.00 L of helium gas. Express the number in scientific notation. Place the decimal after the 2, followed by the other significant digits (2.68). Count the number of places the decimal has moved to the left (22). Add the power of 10 to complete the scientific notation. 2.68 x 1022 atoms 2014 Pearson Education, Inc.

1.6 Scientists Measure Physical Quantities Scientific Notation-The Calculator A scientific calculator has an exponent key (often EXP) for expressing powers of 10. If your calculator reads 7.45 E-17, the proper way to write the answer in scientific notation is 7.45 x 1017. To enter the number in your calculator, type 7.45, press the exponent button (EXP) and type in the exponent (17) followed by the +/ key (-).

2014 Pearson Education, Inc. 1.6 Scientists Measure Physical Quantities Significant Figures Each number in a properly recorded measurement is a significant digit (or significant figure). Significant digits express the uncertainty in the measurement. When you count significant digits, start counting with the first nonzero number. Lets look at a reaction measured by three stopwatches Watch Video # CO106c (8:04 Minutes) Scientific Figures (Appendix B)

http://www.conceptualacademy.com/course/conceptualchemistry/16-scientists-measure-physical-quantities Center Bottom Video on above page 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. 1.6 Scientists Measure Physical Quantities Significant Figures Stopwatch A is calibrated to seconds (0 s); Stopwatch B to tenths of a second (0.0 s); and Stopwatch C to hundredths of a second (0.00 s). Stopwatch A reads 35 s; B reads 35.1 s; and C reads 35.08 s. 35 s has two significant

figures. 35.1 s has three significant figures. 35.08 has four significant figures 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. 1.6 Scientists Measure Physical Quantities Measurements are key to understanding observations Matter has mass, but a better description includes the amount of mass and volume By including measurements, we can make

comparisons 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. 1.6 Scientists Measure Physical Quantities Scientists measure physical quantities Length, Mass, Volume, Time, Energy, etc. Any measurement must include a unit along with the number 3 meters, 3 feet, 3 inches 3 meters, 5 meters, 7 meters 2014 Pearson Education, Inc.

1.6 Scientists Measure Physical Quantities The Metric System of Measure Two major unit systems are used United States Customary System Used in the United States for nonscientific purposes (English rather the American System) Systme International (SI) Also known as the International System of Units or The Metric System of Measure Used in most other nations and by scientists worldwide In chemistry and chemistry lab we use the Metric

System to measure (Allied Health also has the Apothecary System of Measure) 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. 1.6 Scientists Measure Physical Quantities The Metric System Definitions A meter was defined as 1/10,000,000 of the distance from the North Pole to the equator. A kilogram (1000 grams) was equal to the mass of a cube of water measuring 0.1 m on each side. A liter was set equal to the volume of one kilogram of water at 4 C.

2014 Pearson Education, Inc. 1.6 Scientists Measure Physical Quantities 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. 1.6 Scientists Measure Physical Quantities For example, the prefix kilo- increases a base unit by 1000: 1 kilogram is 1000 grams. The prefix milli- decreases a base unit by a factor of 1000: 1000 millimeters is 1 meter

2014 Pearson Education, Inc. 1.6 Scientists Measure Physical Quantities Unit Equation A unit equation relates two quantities that are equal. For example: 1 kilometer = 1000 meters 1 km = 1000 m Also, we can write: 1 centimeter = 1/100 of a meter 1 cm = 0.01 m 2014 Pearson Education, Inc.

1.6 Scientists Measure Physical Quantities Unit Factors A unit conversion factor, or unit factor, is a ratio of two equivalent quantities. For the unit equation 1 m = 100 cm, we can write two unit factors: 1m 100 cm or 100 cm 1m

Watch Video # CO106a (5:26 Minutes) http://www.conceptualacademy.com/course/conceptual-chemistry/ 16-scientists-measure-physical-quantities Right bottom Video Visit Dimensional Analysis Web Site: http://www.lsua.info/chem1001/dimanalysis/unitanalysisIntro.htm Reference: See Page 18 Chapter 1 Section 1.6 Suchocki 2014 Pearson Education, Inc.

1.6 Scientists Measure Physical Quantities Metric system uses a decimal system Each unit is related by a factor of ten Prefixes show the power of ten 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. 1.6 Scientists Measure Physical Quantities Project #2: Measurement via Gasoline Project In Chemistry we collect data in the laboratory while performing an experiment. Our second project concerns measurement and data collection in the field (1020 has no lab component). As an experiment you can do from the 1st week to the last, we can find out what your energy consumption and cost are for driving a car. So here is the project which we will start ASAP and finish the last week of the term.

During the first weeks of class you need to fill your gasoline tank in your car. During the course you will keep a record of all purchases of gasoline noting dates, price, amount, cost and odometer reading. Get receipts or keep a diary in your vehicle. Then transfer each purchase to a data page or in a spreadsheet. Collecting the data (10 points) and presenting the data collected (5 Points) is three fourths of the grade or 15 points. This experiment is four small projects as it is an intense 12-14 week project for 20 points. During the last weeks, you fill your tank again and record the data.

The chemical reaction for combusting gasoline is: 2 C8H18 (l) + 25 O2 (g) 16 CO2 (g) + 18 H2O (g) (Burn 1 gallon put 18.7 Lbs CO2 in the environment!) 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. 1.6 Scientists Measure Physical Quantities Calculations/Projections/Conclusions (5 points): What is your annual mileage?:

Annual Mileage = your daily average miles driven calculated above multiplied by 365 days your projected annual need for gasoline?: Annual Gasoline Demand: Your average Gallons Used multiplied by 365 days What will be annual cost at $2.00 per gallon; $2.50 per gallon, $3.00 per gallon; $3.50 per gallon; $4.00 per gallon; $4.50 per gallon; and $5.00 per gallon?. Annual Cost @ $2.00/gallon = Yearly Gasoline Demand(gallons) multiplied by $2.00/gallon Annual Cost @ $2.50/gallon = Yearly Gasoline Demand(gallons) multiplied by $2.50/gallon

Annual Cost @ $3.00/gallon = Yearly Gasoline Demand(gallons) multiplied by $3.00/gallon Annual Cost @ $3.50/gallon = Yearly Gasoline Demand(gallons) multiplied by $3.50/gallon Annual Cost @ $4.00/gallon = Yearly Gasoline Demand(gallons) multiplied by $4.00/gallon Annual Cost @ $4.50/gallon = Yearly Gasoline Demand(gallons) multiplied by $4.50/gallon Annual Cost @ $5.00/gallon = Yearly Gasoline Demand(gallons) multiplied by $5.00/gallon

Total Pounds of Carbon Dioxide released into the atmosphere by you every year? Total Annual CO2 Released = Total Annual Gallons Used multiplied by 18.7 pounds/gallon The instructor may add additional data for you to determine to complete this project. Presentation and projections are worth one half the grade or 10 points. If your family has more than one car, extra credit may

be earned for doing two projects for the 12-14 weeks. These calculations should be done in a spreadsheet or typed in table format, but the spreadsheet may either be hand drawn on your data page or done on the computer. You may also keep your data in a small notebook you keep in the car. You need to only fill the tank twice, at the beginning and at the end of the project. You will not use the first fill-up in your calculations, except odometer reading. Why? If you do not drive or own a vehicle and can not get cooperation from your family, the instructor will assigned an alternate energy demand project(My Electric Demand!) or you may earn 20 total points using the data of your instructors car (4 years). Write a summary/Conclusions and statement of what you learned from this project (one papegraph)! 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. 1.6 Scientists Measure Physical Quantities 2014 Pearson Education, Inc.

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