Designing a Work Integrated Assessment The concept of

Designing a Work Integrated Assessment The concept of

Designing a Work Integrated Assessment The concept of a work integrated assessment is an assessment where the tasks and conditions are more closely aligned to what you would experience within employment. Collaborate Project Multiple Assessment Points Bringing together staff, students and employers to create employability focused assessments enhanced by technology Move to a more distributed pattern of assessment; consider introducing surprise points Assessments are often delivered in the form of one summative assessment, e.g. an exam or essay, at the end of a period of formal learning. In employment however, assessment or evaluation points tend to occur frequently. In addition, timing is often out of individual control, and consequently it can be necessary to juggle competing tasks at short notice. Using multiple assessment points helps to develop reflective thinking, whilst surprise points support task prioritisation. Module: Co-ordinator: Year: Peer / Self Review Time Include peer and/or self review explicitly in the assessment process Typically the review of assessments (i.e. feedback) in formal education is only provided by teaching staff. In employment, however, much of the review process comes in multiple forms, e.g. informal peer feedback from colleagues, formal and informal reviews from clients, and self-review of personal performance. Including peer and/or self review explicitly within an assessment helps students to develop critical thinking skills, and encourages articulation and evidencing. Varied Audiences Aim to set explicit audiences for each assessment point In higher education the audience for an assessment is implicitly the academic that sets it, who will naturally be already aligned in some way with the course and / or module. This contrasts with employment, where the audience can be peers, but is more often the client or another external third party, with different values, priorities and expectations. Having to think for a different audience on an assessment provokes greater reflective thinking, and requires new types of synthesis. Audience Problem / Data Light Structure Real World Problem / Data Lightly structure the overall assessment; reward student approaches Most thinking on assessment suggests that there should be explicit guidance to students concerning how and where marks are attained. However in employment part of the challenge for the individual and/or team is the structuring of the work that needs to be completed. Tasks need to be identified, processes decided, and priorities allocated. Using a light structure approach encourages students to plan tasks and goals in order to solve a bigger problem, strengthening their project management and prioritisation skills. Set an overall real world problem, supported by real world data Purely academic learning might require a theoretical problem in order to test a theoretical understanding. In employment though problems tend to be very real, and the data that you need to work with rarely comes in coherent, standardised forms. It is usually in 'messier' formats that need to be interpreted to be of use. Using a real world problem and real world data helps to develop skills in analysis, interpretation and evaluation. Review Collaboration Structure Collaborative Working Create teams of students from the outset, encourage collaboration Many forms of assessment require working alone, yet employment invariably requires some form of collaboration and team work, and often with unknown and perhaps even challenging individuals. Encouraging students to work collaboratively and in teams improves their ability to negotiate and discuss, and develops their understanding of team roles and role flexibility. For more information contact Richard Osborne ([email protected]) Project blog available at http://blogs.exeter.ac.uk/collaborate/ Designing a Work Integrated Assessment The concept of a work integrated assessment is an assessment where the tasks and conditions are more closely aligned to what you would experience within employment. Collaborate Project Multiple Assessment Points Move to a more distributed pattern of assessment; consider introducing surprise points Assessments are often delivered in the form of one summative assessment, e.g. an exam or essay, at the end of a period of formal learning. In employment however, assessment or evaluation points tend to occur frequently. In addition, timing is often out of individual control, and consequently it can be necessary to juggle competing tasks at short notice. Using multiple assessment points helps to develop reflective thinking, whilst surprise points support task prioritisation. Module: Co-ordinator: Year: Peer / Self Review Include peer and/or self review explicitly in the assessment process Typically the review of assessments (i.e. feedback) in formal education is only provided by teaching staff. In employment, however, much of the review process comes in multiple forms, e.g. informal peer feedback from colleagues, formal and informal reviews from clients, and self-review of personal performance. Including peer and/or self review explicitly within an assessment helps students to develop critical thinking skills, and encourages articulation and evidencing. Bringing together staff, students and employers to create employability focused assessments enhanced by technology Time Overview Overview This Thisexample exampleshows showsaablank blanksheet, sheet,designed designedto tobe beused usedby by collaborative collaborativeteams teamsof ofstaff, staff,students studentsand andemployers employerswho whohave have already alreadyexpressed expressedaadesire desireto tocreate createaawork work integrated integrated assessment. assessment.Six Sixdimensions dimensionsare areshown shownwhich whichare arethe thehallmarks hallmarks of ofoowork-integrated work-integratedassessment. assessment.The Thesheet sheetisisaathinking thinkingtool toolto to help helpthe thedesign designteam teamreflect reflecton onhow howaacurrent currentassessment assessmentmight might be bemarked markedon onthe thesix sixdimensions dimensionsof ofthe theradar radarchart, chart,and andwhat what changes changesmight mightbe bemade madeto

tomove movealong alongthese thesesix sixdimensions. dimensions. Varied Audiences Aim to set explicit audiences for each assessment point In higher education the audience for an assessment is implicitly the academic that sets it, who will naturally be already aligned in some way with the course and / or module. This contrasts with employment, where the audience can be peers, but is more often the client or another external third party, with different values, priorities and expectations. Having to think for a different audience on an assessment provokes greater reflective thinking, and requires new types of synthesis. Audience The Themodel modelisisdesigned designedto tobe beused usedininthree threestages: stages:(1) (1)An Ananalysis analysis stage stageto tounderstand understandhow howthe theassessments assessmentsfor foraamodule module currently currentlymap mapto tothe thedimensions, dimensions,followed followedimmediately immediatelyby; by;(2) (2)AA design designstage stagewhere wherechanges changesto tothe theassessments assessmentsare areproposed proposed that thatwill willcreate createmovement movementalong alongthe thedimensions, dimensions,followed followedmuch much later laterby; by;(3) (3)An Anevaluation evaluationstage stageafter afterthe theassessments assessmentshave haverun run to toassess assessthe theimpact impactof ofdesigned designedchanges. changes. Problem / Data Light Structure Real World Problem / Data Lightly structure the overall assessment; reward student approaches Most thinking on assessment suggests that there should be explicit guidance to students concerning how and where marks are attained. However in employment part of the challenge for the individual and/or team is the structuring of the work that needs to be completed. Tasks need to be identified, processes decided, and priorities allocated. Using a light structure approach encourages students to plan tasks and goals in order to solve a bigger problem, strengthening their project management and prioritisation skills. Set an overall real world problem, supported by real world data Purely academic learning might require a theoretical problem in order to test a theoretical understanding. In employment though problems tend to be very real, and the data that you need to work with rarely comes in coherent, standardised forms. It is usually in 'messier' formats that need to be interpreted to be of use. Using a real world problem and real world data helps to develop skills in analysis, interpretation and evaluation. Review Collaboration Structure Collaborative Working Create teams of students from the outset, encourage collaboration Many forms of assessment require working alone, yet employment invariably requires some form of collaboration and team work, and often with unknown and perhaps even challenging individuals. Encouraging students to work collaboratively and in teams improves their ability to negotiate and discuss, and develops their understanding of team roles and role flexibility. For more information contact Richard Osborne ([email protected]) Project blog available at http://blogs.exeter.ac.uk/collaborate/ Designing a Work Integrated Assessment The concept of a work integrated assessment is an assessment where the tasks and conditions are more closely aligned to what you would experience within employment. Module: Collaborate Project Multiple Assessment Points Move to a more distributed pattern of assessment; consider introducing surprise points Assessments are often delivered in the form of one summative assessment, e.g. an exam or essay, at the end of a period of formal learning. In employment however, assessment or The analysis stage is an opportunity to think about how the assessments for The analysis stage is an opportunity to think about how the assessments for tend to occur frequently. In addition, timing is evaluation points the often outItIt ofmay individual control, and consequently it can be themodule moduleunder underdiscussion discussioncurrently currentlymap mapto tothe thedimensions dimensionsmodel. model. may necessary to juggle competing tasks at short notice. well already wellbe bethe thecase casethat thatsome someaspects aspectsof ofthe thecurrent currentassessments assessmentsare are Usingalready multiple assessment points helps to develop reflective well tool to welldeveloped developedininterms termsof ofthese thesedimensions. dimensions.The Thepurpose purposeof ofthe the toolisis to surprise points support task prioritisation.

thinking, whilst Bringing together staff, students and employers to create employability focused assessments enhanced by technology Analysis AnalysisStage Stage Co-ordinator: Year: help helpthe thecollaborative collaborativeteam teamvisualise visualisethis, this,and andhighlight highlightareas areaswhich whicharent arent perhaps perhapsas aswell welldeveloped developedas asothers. others. Peer / Self Review No explicit attempt has Include peer and/or self review explicitly in the assessment No explicit attempt hasbeen beenmade madeto toquantify quantifythe thescales scalesof ofthe theaxes. axes.Teams Teams process are encouraged to use the boundaries implied by the top and bottom of are encouraged to use the boundaries implied by the top and bottom ofthe the Typically the review of assessments (i.e. feedback) in formal scales, together their scales, together with theirinterpretation interpretationof ofthe thebest bestand andworst worstaspects aspectsof of education is only provided by teaching staff. with In employment, their assessments, as however, much of the review process comes in multiple forms, theircurrent current assessments, asoverall overallguides guidesfor forrating ratingwithin withinthe themodel. model. e.g. informal peer feedback from colleagues, formal and informal reviews from clients, and self-review of personal performance. Including peer and/or self review explicitly within an assessment helps students to develop critical thinking skills, and encourages articulation and evidencing. Time Review Audience Structure Light Structure Lightly structure the overall assessment; reward student approaches Most thinking on assessment suggests that there should be explicit guidance to students concerning how and where marks are attained. However in employment part of the challenge for the individual and/or team is the structuring of the work that needs to be completed. Tasks need to be identified, processes decided, and priorities allocated. Using a light structure approach encourages students to plan tasks and goals in order to solve a bigger problem, strengthening their project management and prioritisation skills. Evaluation Varied Audiences Aim to set explicit audiences for each assessment point In higher education the audience for an assessment is implicitly the academic that sets it, who will naturally be already aligned in some way with the course and / or module. This contrasts with employment, where the audience can be peers, but is more often the client or another external third party, with different values, priorities and expectations. Having to think for a different audience on an assessment provokes greater reflective thinking, and requires new types of synthesis. Problem / Data Real World Problem / Data Collaboration Collaborative Working Create teams of students from the outset, encourage collaboration Many forms of assessment require working alone, yet employment invariably requires some form of collaboration and team work, and often with unknown and perhaps even challenging individuals. Encouraging students to work collaboratively and in teams improves their ability to negotiate and discuss, and develops their understanding of team roles and role flexibility. Set an overall real world problem, supported by real world data Purely academic learning might require a theoretical problem in order to test a theoretical understanding. In employment though problems tend to be very real, and the data that you need to work with rarely comes in coherent, standardised forms. It is usually in 'messier' formats that need to be interpreted to be of use. Using a real world problem and real world data helps to develop skills in analysis, interpretation and evaluation. For more information contact Richard Osborne ([email protected]) Project blog available at http://blogs.exeter.ac.uk/collaborate/ Designing a Work Integrated Assessment The concept of a work integrated assessment is an assessment where the tasks and conditions are more closely aligned to what you would experience within employment. Collaborate Project Design DesignStage Stage Move to a more distributed pattern of assessment; consider Multiple Assessment Points The design stage is where changes to the assessments are proposed that introducing surprise points create Assessments are often delivered in the form ofwill one willsummative createmovement movementalong alongthe theaxes. axes.The Theadding

adding(or (orpotentially potentially assessment, e.g. an exam or essay, at the end of a period of of removing) removing) ofcomponents componentsisisdiscussed discussedthat thatwill willhelp helpto tocreate create formal learning. In employment however, assessment or movement along the axes as appropriate. movement evaluation points tend to occur frequently. In addition, timing isalong the axes as appropriate. often out of individual control, and consequently it can be necessary to juggle competing tasks at short notice. Technology TechnologyTop TopTrumps Trumpshave havebeen beendesigned designedto tobe beused usedininconjunction conjunction Using multiple assessment points helps to develop reflective with withthis thismodel, model,which whichsuggest suggestdigital digitaltechnologies technologiesthat thatcould couldsupport support thinking, whilst surprise points support task prioritisation. Module: Co-ordinator: Year: Time Peer / Self Review Include peer and/or self review explicitly in the assessment process Typically the review of assessments (i.e. feedback) in formal education is only provided by teaching staff. In employment, however, much of the review process comes in multiple forms, e.g. informal peer feedback from colleagues, formal and informal reviews from clients, and self-review of personal performance. Including peer and/or self review explicitly within an assessment helps students to develop critical thinking skills, and encourages articulation and evidencing. Light Structure the theproposed proposedchanges. changes.Examples Examplesmight mightbe beaawiki wikito tooosupport supportthe the Collaboration Collaborationdimension, dimension,aaproject projectmanagement managementtool toolto tosupport supportthe the Structure the dimension. Structuredimension, dimension,or orperhaps perhapsaablog blogto tosupport supportVaried theTime Time dimension. Audiences Review Audience Structure Lightly structure the overall assessment; reward student approaches Most thinking on assessment suggests that there should be explicit guidance to students concerning how and where marks are attained. However in employment part of the challenge for the individual and/or team is the structuring of the work that needs to be completed. Tasks need to be identified, processes decided, and priorities allocated. Using a light structure approach encourages students to plan tasks and goals in order to solve a bigger problem, strengthening their project management and prioritisation skills. Analysis Bringing together staff, students and employers to create employability focused assessments enhanced The design stage is where changes to the assessments are proposed thatby technology Evaluation Aim to set explicit audiences for each assessment point In higher education the audience for an assessment is implicitly the academic that sets it, who will naturally be already aligned in some way with the course and / or module. This contrasts with employment, where the audience can be peers, but is more often the client or another external third party, with different values, priorities and expectations. Having to think for a different audience on an assessment provokes greater reflective thinking, and requires new types of synthesis. Problem / Data Real World Problem / Data Collaboration Collaborative Working Create teams of students from the outset, encourage collaboration Many forms of assessment require working alone, yet employment invariably requires some form of collaboration and team work, and often with unknown and perhaps even challenging individuals. Encouraging students to work collaboratively and in teams improves their ability to negotiate and discuss, and develops their understanding of team roles and role flexibility. Set an overall real world problem, supported by real world data Purely academic learning might require a theoretical problem in order to test a theoretical understanding. In employment though problems tend to be very real, and the data that you need to work with rarely comes in coherent, standardised forms. It is usually in 'messier' formats that need to be interpreted to be of use. Using a real world problem and real world data helps to develop skills in analysis, interpretation and evaluation. For more information contact Richard Osborne ([email protected]) Project blog available at http://blogs.exeter.ac.uk/collaborate/ Designing a Work Integrated Assessment The concept of a work integrated assessment is an assessment where the tasks and conditions are more closely aligned to what you would experience within employment.. Collaborate Project Multiple Assessment Points Move to a more distributed pattern of assessment; consider introducing surprise points Assessments are often delivered in the form of one summative assessment, e.g. an exam or essay, at the end of a period of formal learning. In employment however, assessment or evaluation points tend to occur frequently. In addition, timing is often out of individual control, and consequently it can be necessary to juggle competing tasks at short notice. Using multiple assessment points helps to develop reflective thinking, whilst surprise points support task prioritisation. Module: Co-ordinator: Year: Bringing together staff, students and employers to create employability focused assessments enhanced by technology Time Peer / Self Review Varied Audiences Include peer and/or self review explicitly in the assessment process Typically the review of assessments (i.e. feedback) in formal education is only provided by teaching staff. In employment, The stage using dimensions model isis

however, much of the reviewthe process comes in multiple forms, Thefinal final stage using the dimensions model e.g. informal peer feedback from colleagues, formal and have an stage the anevaluation evaluation stageafter after theassessments assessments have informal reviews from clients, and self-review of personalof run, run,which whichwill willevaluate evaluatethe theoverall overallimpact impact of performance. the designed changes. Including peer and/or self review explicitly within an the designed changes. assessment helps students to develop critical thinking skills, and encourages articulation and evidencing. A separate evaluation tool has been designed Aim to set explicit audiences for each assessment point In higher education the audience for an assessment is implicitly the academic that sets it, who will naturally be already aligned in some way with the course and / or module. This contrasts with employment, where the audience can be peers, but is more often the client or another external third party, with different values, priorities and expectations. Having to think for a different audience on an assessment provokes greater reflective thinking, and requires new types of synthesis. Evaluation EvaluationStage Stage Review Audience A separate evaluation tool has been designed for foruse usewith withthe themodel, model,which whichcreates createsaathird third polygon polygonto toillustrate illustratevisually visuallyhow howthose those involved involvedwith withthe theassessment assessmentthink thinkthey theyhave have developed developedininterms termsof ofthe thesix sixdimensions. dimensions.The The dimensions dimensionsthemselves themselvesare arenot notdirectly directly referenced, referenced,instead instead48 48skill skillcards cardsare arerated ratedby by participants participantson onaa7-stage 7-stageLikert Likerttype typescale. scale.The The cards cardsare arepre-coded pre-codedwith withone oneof ofthe thesix six dimensions, dimensions,and andhence henceaascore scorefor foreach each dimension dimensioncan canbe beextracted extractedfrom fromthe thedata databy by the theevaluators, evaluators,and andapplied appliedto tothe themodel. model. Light Structure Structure Lightly structure the overall assessment; reward student approaches Most thinking on assessment suggests that there should be explicit guidance to students concerning how and where marks are attained. However in employment part of the challenge for the individual and/or team is the structuring of the work that needs to be completed. Tasks need to be identified, processes decided, and priorities allocated. Using a light structure approach encourages students to plan tasks and goals in order to solve a bigger problem, strengthening their project management and prioritisation skills. Analysis Design Problem / Data Real World Problem / Data Collaboration Collaborative Working Create teams of students from the outset, encourage collaboration Many forms of assessment require working alone, yet employment invariably requires some form of collaboration and team work, and often with unknown and perhaps even challenging individuals. Encouraging students to work collaboratively and in teams improves their ability to negotiate and discuss, and develops their understanding of team roles and role flexibility. Set an overall real world problem, supported by real world data Purely academic learning might require a theoretical problem in order to test a theoretical understanding. In employment though problems tend to be very real, and the data that you need to work with rarely comes in coherent, standardised forms. It is usually in 'messier' formats that need to be interpreted to be of use. Using a real world problem and real world data helps to develop skills in analysis, interpretation and evaluation. For more information contact Richard Osborne ([email protected]) Project blog available at http://blogs.exeter.ac.uk/collaborate/

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