Poetry Analysis: John Donne

Poetry Analysis: John Donne

Poetry Analysis: John Donne By: Marilyn Braojos Kimanh Nguyen Faith Sola A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning As virtuous men pass mildly away, And whisper to their souls to go, Whilst some of their sad friends do say The breath goes now, and some say, No: So let us melt, and make no noise, No tear-floods, nor sigh-tempests move; 'Twere profanation of our joys To tell the laity our love.

Moving of th' earth brings harms and fears, Men reckon what it did, and meant; But trepidation of the spheres, Though greater far, is innocent. Dull sublunary lovers' love (Whose soul is sense) cannot admit Absence, because it doth remove Those things which elemented it. But we by a love so much refined, That our selves know not what it is, Inter-assured of the mind, Care less, eyes, lips, and hands to miss. Our two souls therefore, which are one, Though I must go, endure not yet A breach, but an expansion, Like gold to airy thinness beat. A Valediction: Forbidding

Mourning (Continued) If they be two, they are two so As stiff twin compasses are two; Thy soul, the fixed foot, makes no show To move, but doth, if the other do. And though it in the center sit, Yet when the other far doth roam, It leans and hearkens after it, And grows erect, as that comes home. Such wilt thou be to me, who must, Like th' other foot, obliquely run; Thy firmness makes my circle just, And makes me end where I begun. A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning Summary: Usually during the final days of a persons life, the loved ones surrounding them

assume the roles of mourners in denial, anger, and pain. John Donne in, A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning, juxtaposes the idea between natural disasters, spirituality, and death to the love between his wife and him. A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning Connotation/Analysis: -Literary Terms 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Onomatopoeia

Hyperbole Metaphors Alliteration Simile Synecdoche Enjambment Allusion Symbol 1. Onomatopoeia: Whispers to their souls to go, [Line 2] 2. Hyperbole: No tear-floods, nor sigh-tempests move; [Line 6] 3. Metaphors: So let us melt, and make no noise, [Line 5&6] The soul, the fix'd foot, makes no show [Line 27] 4. Alliteration: Whilst some of their sad friends do say No: (S) [Line 3]

Dull sublunary lovers love (L) [Line 13] (Whose soul is sense) (S) [Line 14] Care less eyes, lips, and hands to miss (S) [Line 20] A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning Connotation/Analysis (Continued): -Literary Terms 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Onomatopoeia Hyperbole Metaphors Alliteration Simile Synecdoche Enjambment Allusion Symbol 5. Simile: Like gold to airy thinness beat. [Line 24] 6. Synecdoche: Care less eyes, lips, and hands to miss [Line 20] 7. Enjambment: (Whose soul is sense) cannot admit/ absence... [Line 14] Though I must go, endure not yet/ A breach, but an expansion, [Line 22 & 23]

8. Allusion: Our two souls therefore, which are one, [Line 21] 9. Symbol: Thy soul, the fixd foot, makes no show [Line 27] A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning Attitude Tone Sanguine: The ability to remain optimistic in a difficult situation It leans and hearkens after it,/ and grows erect, as that comes home. [Line 31 & 32] And makes me end when I begun [Line 36] Shifts

Volta 1. Between stanza 2 & 3 - From love to nature 2. Between stanza 4 & 5 - From senses to a personalized love (Donne and his wife) 3. Between stanza 8 & 9 - From metaphorical and convulted to everything plain A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning Sound Effects: Punctuation Donne uses four different types of punctuation, including: commas, dashes, periods, colons, and semicolons.

Rhyme & Rhythm - Iambic tetrameter (8 syllables) - Trochee: a reverse iambic foot (2) [Line 9]: Moving of thearth brings harms and fear, [Line 15]: Absence, because it doth remove - Epithet: Tear-floods/sigh-tempest - To preserve the scheme of the iambic tetrameter, Donne combined the words, it were to Twere - Type of Poem: Lyric A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning Theme: John Donne in A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning, incorporates the themes of love, lust, spirituality, and loyalty. It apparent the Donne favors spirituality over physical attractions as demonstrated through his various juxtapositions

contributing to the overall meaning of the work as a whole. Meditation XVII NUNC LENTO SONITU DICUNT, MORIERIS. Now this bell tolling softly for another, says to me, Thou must die. PERCHANCE he for whom this bell tolls may be so ill, as that he knows not it tolls for him; and perchance I may think myself so much better than I am, as that they who are about me, and see my state, may have caused it to toll for me, and I know not that. The church is Catholic, universal, so are all her actions; all that she does belongs to all. When she baptizes a child, that action concerns me; for that child is thereby connected to that body which is my head too, and ingrafted into that body whereof I am a member. And when she buries a man, that action concerns me: all mankind is of one author, and is one volume; when one man dies, one chapter is not torn out of the book, but translated into a better language; and every chapter must be so translated; God employs several translators; some pieces are translated by age, some by sickness, some by war, some by Meditation XVII (Continued)

justice; but God's hand is in every translation, and his hand shall bind up all our scattered leaves again for that library where every book shall lie open to one another. As therefore the bell that rings to a sermon calls not upon the preacher only, but upon the congregation to come, so this bell calls us all; but how much more me, who am brought so near the door by this sickness. There was a contention as far as a suit (in which both piety and dignity, religion and estimation, were mingled), which of the religious orders should ring to prayers first in the morning; and it was determined, that they should ring first that rose earliest. If we understand aright the dignity of this bell that tolls for our evening prayer, we would be glad to make it ours by rising early, in that application, that it might be ours as well as his, whose indeed it is. The bell doth toll for him that thinks it doth; and though it intermit again, yet from that minute that that occasion wrought upon him, he is united to God. Who casts not up his eye to the sun when it rises? but who takes off his eye from a comet when that breaks out? Who bends not his ear to any bell which upon any occasion Meditation XVII (Continued) rings? but who can remove it from that bell which is passing a piece of himself out of this world?

No man is an island, entire of itself; every man is a piece of the continent, a part of the main. If a clod be washed away by the sea, Europe is the less, as well as if a promontory were, as well as if a manor of thy friend's or of thine own were: any man's death diminishes me, because I am involved in mankind, and therefore never send to know for whom the bells tolls; it tolls for thee. Neither can we call this a begging of misery, or a borrowing of misery, as though we were not miserable enough of ourselves, but must fetch in more from the next house, in taking upon us the misery of our neighbours. Truly it were an excusable covetousness if we did, for affliction is a treasure, and scarce any man hath enough of it. No man hath affliction enough that is not matured and ripened by and made fit for God by that affliction. If a man carry treasure in bullion, or in a wedge of gold, and have none coined into current Meditation XVII (Continued) money, his treasure will not defray him as he travels. Tribulation is treasure in the nature of it, but it is not current money in the use of it, except we get nearer and nearer our home, heaven, by it. Another man may be sick too, and sick to death, and this affliction may lie in his bowels, as gold in a mine, and be of no use to him; but this bell, that tells me of his affliction, digs out and applies that gold to me: if by this consideration of another's danger I take mine own into contemplation, and so secure myself, by making

my recourse to my God, who is our only security. Meditation XVII Summary: Among our communities, death is usually viewed with trepidation. John Donne in Meditation 17 views himself as he is approaching death, as is made apparent through the church bells signifying a funeral, implying that every death diminishes the large fabric of humanity. We are all in the world together, and we have to use the suffering of others to learn how to live better so that we are prepared for our own death. Meditation XVII Connotation: -Literary Terms 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Metaphors Similes Synecdoche Allusions/Personification Symbolism 1. Metaphors: When one man dies, one chapter is not torn out of the book, but translated into a better language 2. Simile: ... And this affliction may lie in his bowels, as gold in a mine 3. Synecdoche: ... But Gods hand is in every translation 4. Allusion/Personification: The church is Catholic, universal, so are all her actions 5. Symbolism:

The bell tolls symbolize a funeral. Meditation XVII Attitude Tone Shifts Volta Meditative: The ability to remain calm. He also takes the time to think about God, religion and his health. No man is an island, entire of itself; every man is a piece of the continent, a part of the main -Due to the prose being a narrative with a

consistent point of view, there is no apparent volta in the work. Meditation XVII Sound Effects: Punctuation Donne repeatedly uses a plethora of semicolons, colons, and periods. Rhyme & Rhythm - There is no Iambic meter or rhyme scheme because the poem is written in the form of prose. Meditation XVII

Theme: John Donnes Meditation 17, mainly conveys the idea that all of humanity is connected to one another. Therefore, when a person dies it affects everyone in the population; a point of view that leads to the overall meaning of the work as a whole that, No man is an island, entire of itself; every man is a piece of the continent, a part of the main.

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