Outline for 4/2

Outline for 4/2

Outline Logistics Bayes Nets joint probability distribution, conditional independence graphical representation inference (deduction & diagnosis) Review Logistics Learning Problem Set Due Project Status Movie Ids Sample Queries Reports Due 6/11 Sources of Uncertainty Medical knowledge in logic? Toothache <=> Cavity Problems Too many exceptions to any logical rule

Tiring to write them all down Hard to use enormous rules Doctors have no complete theory for the domain Dont know the state of a given patient state Agent has degree of belief, not certain knowledge 3 Agents With Uncertainty Uncertainty is ubiquitous in any problem-solving domain (except maybe puzzles) Initial state Dont know whether or not a full fuel drum will be available Dont know the contents of every document on the web Plenty we dont know about a patients internal state Effects of actions Sometimes actions just fail We often dont know every precondition and every effect of every action Exogenous events

Other agents or forces change the world out from under us Knowledge Representation Defining a KR Syntax Semantics Atomic sentences, Connectives Nodes, Arcs, cProb Tables Inference Truth Tables Joint probability distribution Evaluating a KR How expressive? Modus Ponens, Resolution, GSAT Twosoundness, phase network prop & algo Inference: completeness

speed Propositional Propositional Logic Logic First Order Logic Datalog STRIPS STRIPSActions Actions Bayes Networks Decision Networks You cant have it all 5 Ways to Represent Uncertainty Disjunction If information is correct but complete, your knowledge might be of the form I am in either s3, or s19, or s55 If I am in s3 and execute a15 I will transition either to s92 or s63

What we cant represent There is very unlikely to be a full fuel drum at the depot this time of day When I execute (pickup ?Obj) I am almost always holding the object afterwards The smoke alarm tells me theres a fire in my kitchen, but sometimes its wrong Numerical Repr of Uncertainty Probability Our state of knowledge about the world is a distribution of the form prob(s), where s is the set of all states 0 <= prob(s) <= 1 for all s S prob(s) = 1 For subsets S1 and S2, prob(s1 S2) = prob(s1) + prob(s2) - prob(s1 S2) Note we can equivalently talk about propositions: prob(p q) = prob(p) + prob(q) - prob(p q) Interval-based methods .4 <= prob(p) <= .6 Fuzzy methods D(tall(john)) = 0.8

Probability As Softened Logic Statements of fact Prob(TB) = .06 Soft rules TB cough Prob(cough | TB) = 0.9 (Causative versus diagnostic rules) Prob(cough | TB) = 0.9 Prob(TB | cough) = 0.05 Probabilities allow us to reason about Possibly inaccurate observations Omitted qualifications to our rules that are (either epistemological or practically) necessary Probabilistic Knowledge Representation and Updating Prior probabilities: Prob(TB) (probability that population as a whole, or population under observation, has the disease)

Conditional probabilities: Prob(TB | cough) updated belief in TB given a symptom Prob(TB | test=neg) updated belief based on possibly imperfect sensor Prob(TB tomorrow | treatment today) reasoning about a treatment (action) The basic update: Prob(H) Prob(H|E1) Prob(H|E1, E2) ... Example: Is This Cow a Menace? Moo Cows are unlikely to be mad. But, Cows that Moo green are more likely to be mad. And, Cool cows are less likely to be mad than hot cows, and the thermometer does a pretty good job of distinguishing between the two.

Basics Random variable takes values Cavity: yes or no Joint Probability Distribution Unconditional probability (prior probability) Ache #Ache Cavity 0.04 #Cavity 0.01 0.06 0.89 P(A) P(Cavity) = 0.1 Conditional Probability P(A|B) P(Cavity | Toothache) = 0.8 Bayes Rule

P(B|A) = P(A|B)P(B) / P(A) 11 Conditional Independence A and P are independent given C P(A | P,C) = P(A | C) Ache Cavity Probe Catches C F F F F T T T T

A F F T T F F T T P F T F T F T F T Prob 0.534 0.356

0.006 0.004 0.048 0.012 0.032 0.008 12 Conditional Independence A and P are independent given C P(A | P,C) = P(A | C) and also P(P | A,C) = P(P | C) Suppose C=True P(A|P,C) = 0.032/(0.032+0.048) = 0.032/0.080 = 0.4 P(A|C) = 0.032+0.008 0.048+0.012+0.032+0.008 = 0.04 / 0.1 = 0.4 C F F

F F T T T T A F F T T F F T T P F T F T F

T F T Prob 0.534 0.356 0.006 0.004 0.012 0.048 0.008 0.032 13 Conditional Independence Can encode joint probability distribution in compact form Ache C T

F P(A) 0.4 0.02 C T F P(P) 0.8 0.4 Cavity P(C) .01 Probe Catches C F

F F F T T T T A F F T T F F T T P F T F T

F T F T Prob 0.534 0.356 0.006 0.004 0.012 0.048 0.008 0.032 14 Summary so Far Bayesian updating Probabilities as degree of belief (subjective) Belief updating by conditioning Prob(H) Prob(H|E1) Prob(H|E1, E2) ... Basic form of Bayes rule

Prob(H | E) = Prob(E | H) P(H) / Prob(E) Conditional independence Knowing the value of Cavity renders Probe Catching probabilistically independent of Ache General form of this relationship: knowing the values of all the variables in some separator set S renders the variables in set A independent of the variables in B. Prob(A|B,S) = Prob(A|S) Graphical Representation... Computational Models for Probabilistic Reasoning What we want a probabilistic knowledge base where domain knowledge is represented by propositions, unconditional, and conditional probabilities an inference engine that will compute Prob(formula | all evidence collected so far) Problems elicitation: what parameters do we need to ensure a complete and consistent knowledge base? computation: how do we compute the probabilities efficiently? Answer (to both problems) a representation that makes structure (dependencies and independencies) explicit

Causality Probability theory represents correlation Absolutely no notion of causality Smoking and cancer are correlated Bayes nets use directed arcs to represent causality Write only (significant) direct causal effects Can lead to much smaller encoding than full JPD Many Bayes nets correspond to the same JPD Some may be simpler than others 17 A Different Network A T

T F F P T F T F P(C) .888889 .571429 .118812 .021622 Ache P(A) .05 Cavity Probe

Catches A T F P(P) 0.72 0.425263 18 Creating a Network 1: Bayes net = representation of a JPD 2: Bayes net = set of cond. independence statements If create correct structure Ie one representing causlity Then get a good network I.e. one thats small = easy to compute with One that is easy to fill in numbers 19

Example My house alarm system just sounded (A). Both an earthquake (E) and a burglary (B) could set it off. John will probably hear the alarm; if so hell call (J). But sometimes John calls even when the alarm is silent Mary might hear the alarm and call too (M), but not as reliably We could be assured a complete and consistent model by fully specifying the joint distribution: Prob(A, E, B, J, M) Prob(A, E, B, J, ~M) etc. Structural Models Instead of starting with numbers, we will start with structural relationships among the variables direct causal relationship from Earthquake to Radio direct causal relationship from Burglar to Alarm direct causal relationship from Alarm to JohnCall Earthquake and Burglar tend to occur independently etc. Possible Bayes Network Earthquake

Burglary Alarm JohnCalls MaryCalls 22 Graphical Models and Problem Parameters What probabilities need I specify to ensure a complete, consistent model given the variables I have identified the dependence and independence relationships I have specified by building a graph structure Answer provide an unconditional (prior) probability for every node in the graph with no parents for all remaining, provide a conditional probability table Prob(Child | Parent1, Parent2, Parent3)

for all possible combination of Parent1, Parent2, Parent3 values Complete Bayes Network Burglary Earthquake P(B) .001 Alarm JohnCalls A T F P(J) .90 .05 B

T T F F E T F T F P(E) .002 P(A) .95 .94 .29 .01 MaryCalls A P(M)

T .70 F .01 24 NOISY-OR: A Common Simple Model Form Earthquake and Burglary are independently cumulative causes of Alarm E causes A with probability p1 B causes A with probability p2 the independently cumulative assumption says Prob(A | E, B) = p1 + p2 - p1p2 in addition, Prob(A | E, ~B) = p1, Prob(A | ~E, B) = p2 finally a spontaneous causality parameter Prob(A | ~E, ~B) = p3 A noisy-OR model with M causes has M+1 parameters while the full model has 2M More Complex Example My house alarm system just sounded (A). Both an earthquake (E) and a burglary (B) could set it off. Earthquakes tend to be reported on the radio (R).

My neighbor will usually call me (N) if he (thinks he) sees a burglar. The police (P) sometimes respond when the alarm sounds. What structure is best? A First-Cut Graphical Model Earthquake Radio Burglary Alarm Neighbor Police Structural relationships imply statements about probabilistic independence P is independent from E and B provided we know the value of A. A is independent of N provided we know the value of B. Structural Relationships and Independence The basic independence assumption (simplified version):

two nodes X and Y are probabilistically independent conditioned on E if every undirected path from X to Y is d-separated by E every undirected path from X to Y is blocked by E if there is a node Z for which one of three conditions hold Z is in E and Z has one incoming arrow on the path and one outgoing arrow Z is in E and both arrows lead out of Z neither Z nor any descendent of Z is in E, and both arrows lead into Z Cond. Independence in Bayes Nets If a set E d-separates X and Y Then X and Y are cond. independent given E Set E d-separates X and Y if every undirected path between X and Y has a node Z such that, either Z X Z E Y

Z Z Why important??? P(A | B,C) = P(A) P(B|A) P(C|A) 29 More on D-Separation Earthquake Radio Burglary Alarm Neighbor Police E->A->P R<-E->A

E->A<-B E?P if know A? What if not know anything? R?A if know E? E?B if not know anything? What if know P? Two Remaining Questions How do we add evidence to the network I know for sure there was an Earthquake Report I think I heard the Alarm, but I might have been mistaken My neighbor reported a burglary ... for the third time this week. How do we compute probabilities of events that are combinations of various node values Prob(R, P | E) (predictive) Prob(B | N, ~P) (diagnostic) Prob(R, ~N | E, ~P) (other)

Adding Evidence Suppose we can set the value of any node to a constant value then I am certain there is an earthquake report is simply setting R = TRUE For uncertain evidence we introduce a new node representing the report itself: although I am uncertain of Alarm I am certain of I heard an alarm-like sound the connection between the two is the usual likelihood ratio E B A A T F Prob("A" | A) 0..95 0.5

A=1 Inference Given exact values for evidence variables Compute posterior probability of query variable P(B) Burglary .001 Alarm JonCalls A P(J) T .90 F .05 Earthq B T T F

F P(E) .002 E P(A) T .95 F .94 T .29 F .01 A P(M) MaryCall T .70 F .01 Diagnostic effects to causes Causal causes to effects Intercausal between causes of common effect explaining away

Mixed 33 Algorithm In general: NP Complete Easy for polytrees I.e. only one undirected path between nodes Express P(X|E) by 1. Recursively passing support from ancestor down Causal support 2. Recursively calc contribution from descendants up Evidential support Speed: linear in the number of nodes (in polytree) 34 Simplest Causal Case Burglary P(B) .001

Suppose know Burglary Want to know probability of alarm P(A|B) = 0.95 Alarm B P(A) .95 T .01 F Burglary P(B) .001 Alarm B P(A) .95 T .01 F

Simplest Diagnostic Case Suppose know Alarm ringing & want to know: Burglary? I.e. want P(B|A) P(B|A) =P(A|B) P(B) / P(A) But we dont know P(A) 1 =P(B|A)+P(~B|A) 1 =P(A|B)P(B)/P(A) + P(A|~B)P(~B)/P(A) 1 =[P(A|B)P(B) + P(A|~B)P(~B)] / P(A) P(A) =P(A|B)P(B) + P(A|~B)P(~B) P(B | A) =P(A|B) P(B) / [P(A|B)P(B) + P(A|~B)P(~B)] = .95*.001 / [.95*.001 + .01*.999] = 0.087 Normalization P(X|Y) P(Y)

P(Y | X) = P(X) = 1 P(X|Y) P(Y) P(X|Y)P(Y) + P(X|~Y)P(~Y) = P(X|Y) P(Y) P(B) Burglary .001 P(B | A) = P(A|B) P(B) s ire qu Re Alarm B P(A) T .95 F .01

ce en nd pe de l in na JonCalls A P(J) T .90 F .05 itio nd co P(A | J) = P(J|A) P(A) P(B | J) = P(B|A) P(A|J) P(B)

General Case U1 Express P(X | E) in terms of contributions of Ex+ and Ex- Um ... + Ex X Z1j Ex- Znj Y1

... Yn Compute contrib of Ex+ by computing effect of parents of X (recursion!) Compute contrib of Ex- by ... Multiply connected nets Quake Burglary Mary Call Quake Alarm+Radio

Radio Alarm Jon Call Burglary Jon Call Mary Call Cluster into polytree 39 Review Question Two astronomers use telescopes to make measurements M1, M2 of the number N of stars in

an area of the sky. Normally there is a small chance of an error (up to one star) but there is also the chance that either telescope could be out of focus (F1, F2) in which case the estimate might be off by quite a few stars. Draw the structure of a good net F1 F2 N ? M1 M2 Decision Networks (Influence Diagrams) Choice of Airport Site Air Traffic Deaths

Litigation Noise Construction Cost U 41 Evaluation Iterate over values to decision nodes Yields a Bayes net Decision nodes act exactly like chance nodes with known probability Calculate the probability of all chance nodes connected to U node Calculate utility

Choose decision with highest utility 42 Outline Logistics Bayes Nets joint probability distribution, conditional independence graphical representation inference (deduction & diagnosis) Review Course Topics by Week

Search & Constraint Satisfaction Knowledge Representation 1: Propositional Logic Autonomous Spacecraft 1: Configuration Mgmt Autonomous Spacecraft 2: Reactive Planning Information Integration 1: Knowledge Representation Information Integration 2: Planning Information Integration 3: Execution; Learning 1 Learn 2: Supervised Learning Learn 3: Wrapper Induction & Reinforcement Learn Bayes Nets: Representation & Inference Unifying View of AI Knowledge Representation Expressiveness Reasoning (Tractability) Search Space being searched Algorithms & performance Specifying a search problem?

What are states (nodes in graph)? What are the operators (arcs between nodes)? Initial state? Goal test? [Cost?, Heuristics?, Constraints?] E.g., Eight Puzzle 1 2 4 5 7 8 3 6 46 Example: AI Planning

Input Description of initial state of world (in some KR) Description of goal (in some KR) Description of available actions (in some KR) Output Sequence of actions 47 How Represent Actions? Simplifying assumptions Atomic time Agent is omniscient (no sensing necessary). Agent is sole cause of change Actions have deterministic effects STRIPS representation

World = set of true propositions Actions: Precondition: (conjunction of literals) Effects (conjunction of literals) north11 a W0 a W1 north12 a W2 Planning as Search Nodes

World states Arcs Actions Initial State The state satisfying the complete description of the initial conds Goal State Any state satisfying the goal propositions Forward-Chaining World-Space Search Initial State C A B Goal State A B C

Planning as Search 2 Nodes Partially specified plans Arcs Adding + deleting actions or constraints (e.g. <) to plan Initial State The empty plan Goal State A plan which when simulated achieves the goal Plan-Space Search pick-from-table(C) pick-from-table(B) How represent plans? How test if plan is a solution? pick-from-table(C)

put-on(C,B) Planning as Search 3 Phase 1 - Graph Expansion Necessary (insufficient) conditions for plan existence Local consistency of plan-as-CSP Phase 2 - Solution Extraction Variables action execution at a time point Constraints goals, subgoals achieved no side-effects between actions Actions A,B exclusive (at a level) if A deletes Bs precond, or B deletes As precond, or A & B have inconsistent preconds Propositions P,Q inconsistent (at a level) if all ways to achive P exclude all ways to achieve Q

Planning as Search 4 Compile planning problem to propositional satisfiability - generate a set of clauses to satisfy. Use a fast solver like GSAT or an incremental solver like an LTMS Search Summary Brute force Heuristic Optimizing Time DFS b^d BFS b^d Iterative deepening b^d Iterative broadening b^d Best first b^d Beam

b^d Hill climbing b^d Simulated annealing b^d Limited discrepancy b^d A* b^d IDA* b^d SMA* b^d Space Complete? Opt? d N N b^d Y Y bd Y Y b^d

b+L b b bd b^d b [b-max] N N N N Y/N Y Y Y N N N N Y/N Y

Y Y Binary Constraint Network Set of n variables: x1 xn Value domains for each variable: D1 Dn Set of binary constraints (also known as relations) Consistent subset of cross product: Rij Di Dj Partial assignment of values with a tuple of pairs Consistent if all constraints satisfied on all vars in tuple Tuple = full solution if consistent & all vars included Tuple {(xi, ai) (xj, aj)} consistent w/ a set of vars Constraint Satisfaction Summary Preprocessing Strategies Search Algorithms

Chronological Backtracking (BT) Backjumping (BJ) Conflict-Directed Backjumping (CBJ) Forward checking (FC) Dynamic variable ordering heuristics Backjumping (BJ) Similar to BT, but more efficient when no consistent instantiation can be found for the current var Instead of backtracking to most recent var BJ reverts to deepest var which was checked against the current var Q Q Q BJ Discovers (2, 5, 3, 6) inconsistent with x6 No sense trying other values of x5 Q Q

Other Strategies CBJ More sophisticated backjumping behavior Each variable has conflict set CS Set of vars that failed consistency checks w/ current val Discovers (2, 5, 3) inconsistent with {x5, x6 } FC Perform Consistency Check Forward Whenever assign var a value Prune inconsistent values from As-yet unvisited variables Backtrack if domain of any var ever collapses Nodes Explored Consistency Checks BT More BT=BM

BJ FC BJ=BMJ=BMJ2 BM BMJ CBJ FC-CBJ FC CBJ=BM-CBJ=BM-CBJ2 FC-CBJ Fewer BMJ2 BM-CBJ

BM-CBJ2 Knowledge Repr. Summary All KR systems logic or probability theory Propositional Logic Syntac Semantics Inference DPLL GSAT First Order Predicate Calculus Terms, , , ... Bayesian Belief Networks Resolution A B C, C D E A B D E Refutation Complete Given an unsatisfiable KB in CNF, Resolution will eventually deduce the empty clause

Proof by Contradiction To show = Q Convert {Q} to CNF Conjunction of disjunctions (clauses) Show result is unsatisfiable! Davis Putnam (DPLL) [1962] Procedure DPLL (CNF formula: ) If is empty, return yes. If there is an empty clause in return no. If there is a pure literal u in return DPLL((u)). If there is a unit clause {u} in return DPLL((u)). Else Select a variable v mentioned in . If DPLL((v))=yes, then return yes. Else return DPLL((v)). Recall: (u) means set u := true in , then simplify

GSAT [1992] Procedure GSAT (CNF formula: , max-restarts, max-climbs) For I := I o max-restarts do A := randomly generated truth assignment for j := 1 to max-climbs do if A satisfies then return yes A := random choice of one of best successors to A ;; successor means only 1 var val changes from A ;; best means making the most clauses true Immobile Robots Cassini Saturn Mission ~ 1 billion $ 7 years to build 7 year cruise ~ 150 - 300 ground operators 150 million $

2 year build 0 ground ops Solution: Part 1 Model-based Programming Programmers and operators generate breadth of functions from commonsense hardware models in light of mission-level goals. Have engineers program in models, automate synthesis of code: models are compositional & highly reusable. generative approach covers broad set of behaviors. commonsense models are easy to articulate at concept stage and insensitive to design variations. Solution: Part 2 Model-based Deductive Executive On the fly reasoning is simpler than code syn. Possible Model modes MI

Discretized Sensed values Scripted Executive configuration Command goals MR goal state MRP current state Model-based Reactive Planner Command

Solution: Part 3 Risc-like Best-first, Deductive Kernel Agenda General deduction CAN achieve reactive time generate generate scales successor successor Incorporate conflicts Test propositional

propositional ITMS ITMS Checked solutions conflict conflict database database Tasks, models compiled into propositional logic Conflicts dramatically focus search Careful enumeration grows agenda linearly ITMS efficiently tracks changes in truth assignments Optimal feasible solutions Conflicts A family of increasingly powerful deductive model-based optimal

controllers Step 1: Model-based configuration management with a partially observable state-free plant. Step 2: Model-based configuration management with a dynamic, concurrent plant. Step 3: Model-based executive with a reactive planner, and an indirectly controllable dynamic, concurrent plant. Specifying a valve Variables = {mode, fin, fout, pin, pout } mode {open, closed, stuck-open, stuck-closed} fin, and fout range over {positive, negative, zero} pin, and pout range over {high, low, nominal} Specifying with mode = open (pin = pout) (fin = fout) mode = closed (fin = zero) (fout = zero) mode = stuck-open (pin = pout) (fin = fout) mode = stuck-closed (fin = zero) (fout = zero) Mode identification + reconfiguration mode

ident. Plant S o(t) (t) s(t) s(t) mode reconfig. g Configuration management achieved by Mode identification identifies the system state based only on observables Mode reconfiguration reconfigures the system state to achieve goals

f (t) Example: Cassini propulsion system Helium tank Oxidizer tank Pressure1 = nominal Flow1 = zero Acceleration = zero Fuel tank Pressure2= nominal Flow2 = positive Main Engines Conflict from observation Flow1 = zero

MI/MR as combinatorial optimization MI variables: components with domains the possible modes an assignment corresponds to a candidate diagnosis feasibility: consistency with observations cost: probability of a candidate diagnosis MR variables: components with domains the possible modes an assignment corresponds to a candidate repair feasibility: entailment of goal cost: cost of repair Knowledge Representation First-Order Predicate Calculus Datalog Bayes Networks Relational Algebra Propositional Logic

Propositional. Logic vs First Order Ontology Syntax Objects (e.g. Dan) Facts: P, Q Properties (e.g. mother-of) Relations (e.g. female) Variables & quantification Atomic sentences Sentences have structure: terms Connectives female(mother-of(X))) Semantics Truth Tables Interpretations (Much more complicated) Inference

NPC, but SAT algos work well Undecidable, but theorem proving works sometimes Look for tractable subsets 75 IIIIIS Representation III [Rajaraman95] Information Source Functionality Info Required? $ Binding Patterns Info Returned? Mapping to World Ontology Source may be incomplete: (not ) For Example IMDBActor($Actor, M) actor-in(M, Part, Actor) Spot($M, Rev, Y) review-of(M, Rev) &

year-of(M, Y) Sidewalk($C, M, Th) shows-in(M, C, Th) Query Planning Given Data source definitions (e.g. in datalog) Query (written in datalog) Produce Plan to gather information I.e. either a conjunctive query Equivalent to a join of several information sources Or a recursive datalog program Necessary to account for functional dependencies, Binding pattern restrictions Maximality Overview of Construction Recursive query plan User query Rectified

user query Source descriptions Inverse rules Functional dependencies Chase rules Limitations on binding patterns Domain rules Transitivity rule Inverse Rules Source description ws(Date,From,To,Pilot,Aircraft) => flight(Airline,Flight_no,From,To) & schedule(Airline,Flight_no,Date,Pilot,Aircraft)

Inverse rules flight(f(D,F,T,P,A),g(D,F,T,P,A),F,T) <= ws(D,F,T,P,A) schedule(f(D,F,T,P,A),g(D,F,T,P,A),D,P,A) <= ws(D,F,T,P,A) variable Airline is replaced by a function term whose arguments are the variables in the source relation Example ws Date 08/28 08/29 09/03 09/04 From sfo nrt sfo fra To

nrt sfo fra sfo Pilot mike ann ann john Aircraft #111 #111 #222 #222 Inverse Rules flight Airline

Flight_no From ?1 ?3 ?5 ?7 ?2 ?4 ?6 ?8 sfo nrt sfo fra To schedule Airline Flight_no Date

Pilot Aircraft nrt sfo fra sfo ?1 ?3 ?5 ?7 mike ann ann john #111 #111 #222 #222

?2 ?4 ?6 ?8 08/28 08/29 09/03 09/04 Efficient & Robust Execution Source,Dest Source,Dest SABRE United Flight Flight

Source,Dest American Flight Source,Dest Southwest Flight 81 Defining a Learning Problem A program is said to learn from experience E with respect to task T and performance measure P, if its performance at tasks in T, as measured by P, improves with experience E. Experience: Task: Performance Measure: Target Function:

Representation of Target Function Approximation Learning Algorithm DT Learning as Search Nodes Decision Trees Operators Initial node Tree Refinement: Sprouting the tree Heuristic? Smallest tree possible: a single leaf Goal? Information Gain Best tree possible (???) Search thru space of Decision Trees Yes

Humid Wind Gain(S,Wind) =0.048 Gain(S,Humid) =0.151 Outlook Gain(S,Outlook) =0.246 Temp Gain(S,Temp) =0.029 Resulting Tree . Good day for tennis? Outlook Sunny

No [2+, 3-] Overcast Yes [4+] Now Recurse: Day Temp Humid Wind Tennis? d1 h h weak n d2 h h s n d8 m h

weak n d9 c n weak yes d11 m n s yes Rain No [2+, 3-] Information Gain Measure of expected reduction in entropy Resulting from splitting along an attribute Gain(S,A) = Entropy(S) - (|S | / |S|) Entropy(S ) v

v Values(A) Where Entropy(S) = -P log2(P) - N log2(N) v Overfitting DT is overfit when exists another DT and DT has smaller error on training examples, but DT has bigger error on test examples Causes of overfitting Noisy data, or Training set is too small Approaches Stop before perfect tree, or Postpruning Comparison Decision Tree learner searches a complete hypothesis space (one capable of representing any possible concept), but it uses an incomplete search method (hill climbing)

Candidate Elimination searches an incomplete hypothesis space (one capable of representing only a subset of the possible concepts), but it does so completely. Note: DT learner works better in practice Ensembles of Classifiers Assume errors are independent Assume majority vote Prob. majority is wrong = area under biomial dist Prob 0.2 0.1 Number of classifiers in error If individual area is 0.3 Area under curve for 11 wrong is 0.026 Order of magnitude improvement! Constructing Ensembles Bagging

Run classifier k times on m examples drawn randomly with replacement from the original set of m examples Training sets correspond to 63.2% of original (+ duplicates) Cross-validated committees Divide examples into k disjoint sets Train on k sets corresponding to original minus 1/k th Boosting Maintain a probability distribution over set of training ex On each iteration, use distribution to sample Use error rate to modify distribution Create harder and harder learning problems... PAC model Error of a hypothesis E(h) Prob hypothesis h is wrong on single instance selected randomly PAC criteria

Prob( E(h) > ) accuracy parameter 0 < < 1 < confidence parameter 0 < < 1 Wrapper Induction [Kushmerick 97] machine learning techniques

to automatically construct wrappers from examples Some Country Codes Some CountryCountry Codes

Some Codes Congo 242
Some CountryCountry Codes

Some Codes Egypt 20
Congo 242
Some CountryCountry Codes

Some

Codes Belize 501
Egypt 20
Congo 242
Some Country Codes

Spain 34
Belize 501
Egypt 20
Congo 242


End Spain 34
Belize 501
Egypt

20


End Spain 34
Belize 501

End Spain 34

End wrapper procedure Wrapper induction algorithm example page supply PAC model parameters automatic page labeler 1. Gather enough pages to satisfy the termination

condition (PAC model). 2. Label example pages. 3. Find a wrapper consistent with the examples. wrapper MDP Model of Agency Time is discrete, actions have no duration, and their effects occur instantaneously. So we can model time and change as {s 0, a0, s1, a1, }, which is called a history or trajectory. At time i the agent consults a policy to determine its next action the agent has full observational powers: at time i it knows the entire history {s0, a0, s1, a1, ... , si} accurately policy might depend arbitrarily on the entire history to this point Taking an action causes a stochastic transition to a new state based on transition probabilities of the form Prob(sj | si, a) the fact that si and a are sufficient to predict the future is the Markov assumption MDP Model of Agency a

si Trajectory s2 a1 a0 s0 s1 ... sj sk sl Before executing a What do you know? Prob(sj | si, a),

Prob(sk | si, a), Prob(sl | si, a), ... Agent consults policy to determine what to do Objective: find policy that maximizes value function over finite horizon (or discounted ) Properties of the Model Assuming full observability bounded and stationary rewards time-separable value function discount factor infinite horizon Optimal policy is stationary Choice of action ai depends only on si Optimal policy is of the form (s) = a which is of fixed size |S|, regardless of the # of stages Value Iteration Dynamic programming approach: start with some v0 (s)

compute vi+1 (s) using the recurrence relationship vi 1 ( s ) arg max a r ( s, a) Pr( s ' | s, a) vi ( s ' ) s' stop when computation converges to convergence guarantee is vn 1 vn vn 1 v 2 * Policy Iteration Note: value iteration never actually computes a policy: you can back it out at the end, but during computation its irrel. Policy iteration as an alternative Initialize 0(s) to some arbitrary vector of actions

Loop Compute vi(s) according to previous formula For each state s, re-compute the optimal action for each state arg max r ( s, a ) ' Pr( s ' | s, ( s ))vi ( s ) i 1 ( s )guaranteed Policy to be at least as good sas last iterationi a Terminate when i(s) = i+1(s) for every state s Guaranteed to terminate and produce an optimal policy. In practice converges faster than value iteration (not in theory) Variant: take updates into account as early as possible. Reinforcement Learning Avoid curse of modeling - Use experience instead! Given only observed state and reward information,

Learn: Transition probabilities Reward function and discount factor Optimal policy Two main approaches: learn the model then infer the policy learn the policy without learning the explicit model parameters Knowledge Representation Defining a KR Syntax Semantics Nodes, Arcs, cProb Tables Inference Joint probability distribution Evaluating a KR Propositional Logic First Order Logic Datalog STRIPS Actions

Bayes Networks Decision Networks How expressive? Polytree algo, clustering, monte carlo Inference: soundness, completeness & speed You cant have it all 101 Basics Random variable takes values Cavity: yes or no Joint Probability Distribution Unconditional probability (prior probability) Ache #Ache Cavity 0.04 #Cavity 0.01 0.06

0.89 P(A) P(Cavity) = 0.1 Conditional Probability P(A|B) P(Cavity | Toothache) = 0.8 Bayes Rule P(B|A) = P(A|B)P(B) / P(A) 102 Conditional Independence Can encode joint probability distribution in compact form Ache C T F

P(A) 0.4 0.02 C T F P(P) 0.8 0.4 Cavity P(C) .01 Probe Catches C F F

F F T T T T A F F T T F F T T P F T F T F

T F T Prob 0.534 0.356 0.006 0.004 0.012 0.048 0.008 0.032 103 Creating a Network 1: Bayes net = representation of a JPD 2: Bayes net = set of cond. independence statements If create correct structure Ie one representing causlity Then get a good network I.e. one thats small = easy to compute with

One that is easy to fill in numbers 104 Complete Bayes Network Burglary Earthquake P(B) .001 Alarm JohnCalls A T F P(J) .90 .05

B T T F F E T F T F P(E) .002 P(A) .95 .94 .29 .01 MaryCalls

A P(M) T .70 F .01 105 Inference Given exact values for evidence variables Compute posterior probability of query variable P(B) Burglary .001 Alarm JonCalls A P(J) T .90 F .05 Earthq B

T T F F P(E) .002 E P(A) T .95 F .94 T .29 F .01 A P(M) MaryCall T .70 F .01 Diagnostic effects to causes Causal causes to effects Intercausal

between causes of common effect explaining away Mixed 106 Algorithm In general: NP Complete Easy for polytrees I.e. only one undirected path between nodes Express P(X|E) by 1. Recursively passing support from ancestor down Causal support 2. Recursively calc contribution from descendants up Evidential support Speed: linear in the number of nodes (in polytree) 107 Course Topics by Week

Search & Constraint Satisfaction Knowledge Representation 1: Propositional Logic Autonomous Spacecraft 1: Configuration Mgmt Autonomous Spacecraft 2: Reactive Planning Information Integration 1: Knowledge Representation Information Integration 2: Planning Information Integration 3: Execution; Learning 1 Learn 2: Supervised Learning Learn 3: Wrapper Induction & Reinforcement Learn Bayes Nets: Representation & Inference

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