Marquetry - Weebly

Marquetry - Weebly

Veneering/inlay/marquetry 1. Veneering Veneering is a method of taking thin slices of more expensive wood and gluing them onto cheap manufactured boards. Why veneers are used: 1. Help reduce the use of

expensive hardwoods 2. Patterns and designs can be made from the various colours. 3. Larger boards can be made. Cutting veneers Rotary Log is debarked

cutting and cut to size Log is softened using steam and boiling water Log is put on a giant lathes and cut with a sharp knife Veneer patterns

Transferring Design & Cutting veneers Design transfer Similar to the method used in carving. Use carbon paper, tape and the design drawn on a sheet. Cutting Cutting along the grain is easy and can be done with a scalpel and ruler. Cutting across the grain requires the veneer to be held down firmly under a piece of MDF and a

heavy steel rule against the cutting line http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MC6CBjVIOR0 2. Inlay Inlaying is a process involving the removal of the groundwork to accommodate the insertion of a material to create a boarder or effect

The inlay can be made from veneer, solid wood, glass, ceramics or metals. Inlay and boarders Inlay and boarders Can also be bought in shops with various designs and patterns Process

Mortise gauge is used to scribe the required track for the boarder (1) Using a chisel turned on its back, the material is removed to the required depth (2) Check the depth by placing the chisel in the trench (3) The strip of inlay is glued

into place and pressed for a few hours. Marquetry Marquetry Marquetry is the art of creating a picture using two or more colours of veneer.

Process Select picture or design and make photocopies. Cut the background or groundwork to the same size as your design. Cut 3 different veneers

to the same size of your design also. Process Copy the design onto all veneers separately using carbon paper and tape. Cut out design on all three veneers carefully Select the best pieces for

the picture Glue and press into place Applying finished design to wood Using tape on one side only, fit required shape together Roughen top of box and fill any holes Apply glue to both surfaces Fix veneer to lid. Squeeze out excess glue using roller or veneer

hammer or veneer press Trim edges Adhesive used for veneers Animal glue Required little pressure to make it set. Non-staining so it wont effect finish Contact or impact glue

Instant bond Veneers wont slide over each other Heat sensitive glue quick and easy to apply Clean and non-staining PVA Gives you time to work with pieces. Strong bond.

Step-by-step Video tools needed http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nXAN7xtWpO8 Drawing design http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qSmXlOARVbs Design transfer and cutting http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MC6CBjVIOR0 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jof5gsgTDZQ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fmo5I_6wzd4 Geometric marquetry

Also known as parquetry this method of applying veneers is used to form basics geometrical shapes. Best example is in the use of making chess boards. Process

Cut strips of equal width. 4 of one colour four of another Secure all strips side by side with masking tape Using a steel rule cut the sheet into strips od the same width as each strip

Process Align every second strip to form a chessboard and cut off remaining outer strips. Finish the edges with a boarder or simple moulding to decorate. Finishing

Oil Easy to apply Gives a nice appearance Wax Easy to apply Easily removed if damaged Attractive finish

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