Introduction to Project Management

Introduction to Project Management

o o P.I.I.M.T American University of Leadership Ahmed Hanane, MBA, Eng, CMA, Partner email: [email protected] Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Whats in it for the first day ? o Introductions 1. 2. 3.

Full Name What do you want to do? A project in mind? The most exciting thing you have done in your life? 1. Course Outline 2. Chapter One Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Chapter 1

Why Project Management? 01-03 Chapter 1 Learning Objectives After completing this chapter, students will be able to: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

01-04 Understand why project management is becoming such a powerful and popular practice in business. Recognize the basic properties including their definition. of projects, Understand why effective project management is such a challenge. Differentiate between project management

practices and more traditional, process-oriented business functions. Recognize the key motivators that are pushing companies to adopt project management practices. Chapter 1 Learning Objectives After completing this chapter, students will be able to: 1. 2. 3.

4. 01-05 Understand and explain the project life cycle, its stages, and the activities that typically occur at each stage in the project. Understand the concept of project success, including various definitions of success, as well as the alternative models of success. Understand the purpose of project management maturity models and the process of benchmarking in organizations. Identify the relevant maturity stages that organizations go through to become proficient in their use of project management techniques.

Introduction o Examples of projects o o o o Highway Rabat - Casablanca Tramway in Casablanca Olympic games in London Launch of iPad Projects, rather than repetitive tasks, are now the basis for most value-added in business -Tom Peters

01-06 What is a Project? o A project is a temporary endeavor undertaken to produce a unique valueadding product or service Temporary o o Characteristics of Projects Unique

Temporary Definitive beginning and end Unique New undertaking, unfamiliar ground Process vs. Project Work Process Ongoing, day-to-day activities to produce goods and services Use existing systems, properties, and capabilities

Typically repetitive Project Take place outside the normal, processoriented world Unique and separate from routine, processdriven work Continually evolving A project is a temporary endeavor undertaken to create a unique product or service.

01-08 PMBoK 2008 Projects? Did it have a start date? Did it have an end date? Was it new?

Project Definitions Summarized A project can be considered any series of activities and tasks that have: Specific objectives to be completed within certain specifications, Defined start and end dates, Funding limits, Human and nonhuman resources, and Multifunctional focus. 01-0 10 Elements of Projects o Complex, one-time processes

o Limited by budget, schedule, and resources o Developed to resolve a clear goal or set of goals o 01-011 Customer-focused General Project Characteristics

01-012 o Ad-hoc endeavors with a clear life cycle o Building blocks in the design and execution of organizational strategies o Responsible for the newest and most improved products, services, and organizational processes o

Provide a philosophy and strategy for the management of change General Project Characteristics 01-13 o Entail crossing functional and organization boundaries o Traditional management functions of planning, organizing, motivating, directing, and controlling

apply o Principal outcomes are the satisfaction of customer requirements within technical, cost, and schedule objectives o Terminated upon successful completion of performance objectives Projects? Project Success Rates o

o o o o o 01-15 Software & hardware projects fail at a 65% rate, Over half of all IT projects become runaways, Only 30% of technology-based projects and programs are a success. Only 2.5% of global businesses achieve 100% project success and over 50% of global

business projects fail, Average success of business-critical application development projects is 32%, and Approximately 42% of the 1,200 Iraq reconstruction projects were eventually terminated due to mismanagement or shoddy construction Why are Projects Important? 1. Shortened product life cycles 2. Narrow product launch windows 3.

Increasingly complex and technical products 4. Emergence of global markets 5. Economic period marked by low inflation 01-16 Project Life Cycles Man Hours

Conceptualizati on 01-17 Planning Execution Termination Fig 1.3 Project Life Cycle Stages Project Life Cycles 01-18 o

Conceptualization - the development of the initial goal and technical specifications. o Planning all detailed specifications, schedules, schematics, and plans are developed o Execution the actual work of the project is performed o Termination project is transferred to

the customer, resources reassigned, project is closed out. Project Life Cycles and Their Effects FIGURE 1.4 Project Life Cycles and Their Effects 01-19 Quadruple Constraint of Project Success 01-20 Figure 1-6 Four Dimensions of Project Success 01-21

FIGURE 1.7 Six Criteria for IT Project Success 01-22 o System quality o Information quality o User acceptance

o User satisfaction o Individual impact o Organizational impact Understanding Success Criteria Iron Triangle Information System Benefits (Organization) Benefits (Stakeholders) Cost Maintainability

Improved efficiency Satisfied users Quality Reliability Improved effectiveness Social and environmental Time Validity Increased profits

Information quality Strategic goals Personal development Use Organization learning Professional learning, Reduced waste impact contractors profits

Capital suppliers, content Project team, economic impact to surrounding 01-23 community Table 1.2 Most Common causes of project failures Scope Creep Poor Requirements Gathering

Unrealistic planning and scheduling Lack of resources What is Project Management o Project Management is the application of skills, knowledge, tools and techniques to meet the needs and expectations of stakeholders for a project. o The purpose of project management

is prediction and prevention, NOT recognition and reaction Triple Contraint Time Quality Cost Scope Triple Contraint o Increased Scope = increased time + increased cost

o Tight Time = increased costs + reduced scope o Tight Budget = increased time + reduced scope. Key Areas of Project Management o o o o o

o o Scope Management Issue Management Cost Management Quality Management Communications Management Risk Management Change Control Management Scope Management o Primarily it is the definition and control of what IS and IS NOT included in the project.

Issue Management o o Issues are restraints to accomplishing the deliverables of the project. Typically identified throughout the project and logged and tracked through resolution. Issue already impacting the cost, time or quality Rope not thick Cost Management o This process is required to ensure

the project is completed within the approved budget and includes: Resources people equipment materials Quantities Budget Quality Management o Quality Management is the process that insure the project will meet the needs conformance to requirements - Crosby

fitness for use - Juran the totality of characteristics of an entity that bear on its ability to satisfy stated and implied need - ISO 8402:1994 Communications Management o This process is necessary to ensure timely and appropriate generation, collection, dissemination, and storage of project information Risk Management o o

Risk identification and mitigation strategy Risk update and tracking Risk POTENTIAL negative impact to project Tree location, accessibility, ownership Weather Change Control Management o Scope Change Define how changes to the

project scope will be executed Technical Specification Changes Schedule changes All changes require collaboration and buy in via the project sponsors signature prior to implementation of the changes Spider Web Diagram (Figure 1.8) 01-37 Spider Web Diagram with Embedded Organizational Evaluation

01-38 Figure 1-9 Developing Project Management Maturity Project Management Maturity (PMM) Models 1. Center for Business Practices 2. Kerzners Project Management Maturity Model 3.

ESI Internationals Project Framework 4. 01-39 SEIs Capability Maturity Model Integration Center for Business Practices PMM o Level 1: Initial Phase o Level 2: Structure, Process, and

Standards o Level 3: Institutionalized Project Management 01-40 o Level 4: Managed o Level 5: Optimizing Kerzners PMM Model

o Level 1: Common Language o Level 2: Common Processes o Level 3: Singular Methodology o Level 4: Benchmarking o

Level 5: Continuous Improvement 01-41 ESI Internationals Project Framework o Level 1: Ad Hoc o Level 2: Consistent o Level 3: Standardized

o Level 4: Quantitative o Level 5: Optimizing 01-42 SEIs Capability Maturity Model Integration 01-43 o Level 1: Initial

o Level 2: Managed o Level 3: Defined o Level 4: Quantitative Management o Level 5: Optimizing Project Management Maturity Generic Model

01-44 FIGURE 1.10 Project Elements and Text Organization 01-45 FIGURE 1.11 Organization of Text Copyright 2013 Pearson Education, Inc. Publishing as Prentice Hall Overview of the Project Management Institutes PMBoK Knowledge Areas

01-46 FIGURE 1.12 Project Manager Responsibilities 1. Selecting a team 2. Developing project objectives and a plan for execution 01-47 3.

Establishing a project charter 4. Performing risk management activities 5. Cost estimating and budgeting 6. Scheduling 7. Managing resources

Summary Understand why project management is becoming such a powerful and popular practice in business today. Recognize the basic properties of projects, including their definition. Understand why effective project management is such a challenge. Recognize the key motivators that are pushing companies to adopt project management practices. 01-48 Summary Understand and explain the project life cycles, its stages, and the activities that typically occur at

each stage in the project. Understand the concept of project success, including various definitions of success, such as the triple constraint, as well as alternative models of success. Understand the purpose of project management maturity models and the process of benchmarking in organizations. Identify the relevant maturity stages that organizations go through to become proficient in their use of project management techniques. 01-49

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