12th Annual Service-Learning Student Showcase

12th Annual Service-Learning Student Showcase

14th Annual Service-Learning Student Showcase Experiential Learning The annual event showcases service-learning projects where students are awarded over $11,000 in scholarships. Much like the Graduate and Undergraduate Research Showcases, students from UCF colleges participate and benefit from learning about academic programming experienced in various disciplines. Students are required to create posters about their projects then present to scholarship committee members and the general public. Each student or student team shares how their service project aligns with course objectives, the value to the community, and fosters civic responsibility. Service-Learning Student Showcase Scholarships ($200-$1000 each) Through the generosity of UCFs Student Government Association, Colleges, Interdisciplinary Studies, and the Experiential Learning over $11,000 in scholarships were awarded in 2017 to service-learning projects presented at the showcase. The scholarship awards include:

Graduate Innovative Project Graduate Leadership Youth Development Capacity Building Pedagogical Value Quality of Display Caliber of Reflection Environmental Sustainability Economic Sustainability Social Sustainability Undergraduate Innovative Project Undergraduate Leadership Significant Impact Literacy Engagement Value to Agency Enhancement of Civic Responsibility Peer Choice Engaging Community Online

Experiential Learning Excellence in Participating Colleges Students also receive Recognition Awards for Excellence in the following: Non-Traditional Literacy Engagement Social Justice Technological Integration Engaging the Arts STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) 14th Annual Service-Learning Student Showcase Award Recipients 2017 Non-Traditional Literacy Engagement Award Mary-Margaret M. Shimada Course: EDE 4943 Internship II Instructors: Dr. Bobby Hoffman (Internship Coordinator), Ms. Stroup (UCF Coordinator), Ms. Haggerty (Service-Learning Teacher) Community Partners: United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) of Central Florida, UCP Pine Hills Charter School, Birds of Prey, Lowes (Education Grant), Evans High School, Dr. Everett (UCF Professor and Singer/Song writer), Home Depot, Valencia College West Campus (Culinary Arts Department), and UF/IFAS Orange County Extension. My service-learning project takes place at the United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) Pine Hills Charter School. This school is one of eight tuition free, nonprofit public charter schools operated by UCP of Central Florida.

Mission statement: To empower children with and without disabilities to achieve their potential by providing individualized support, education and therapy services in an inclusive environment. UCP Charter schools use Project-Based Learning and technology to drive the curriculum. Integrated with music, dance, performing and visual arts which enhances students learning. UCP Pine Hills follows these guidelines. As a teacher intern, I have also volunteered my time, skills and knowledge to: -Write a grant to help renovate the kitchen. It has been non-functional for two years. If awarded, the students will have hot meals and a place for Project-Based Learning. -Create a future internship with Valencia College Culinary Arts students to cook breakfast/lunch. -Create/direct a bucket drumming band. -Create/co-direct a dance troupe. -Create a before/aftercare gardening club. -Invite the Birds of Prey to bring a bald eagle for the entire school to see. -Write/direct a play for two classrooms that was performed for the whole school. -Invite a guest musician that sings science songs to perform for the entire school. - Create/direct the student year end Musical Extravaganza performed at Evans High School Auditorium. I have exceeded my learning objectives and as a result of my volunteer efforts, the students have experienced learning situations they have not encountered before. Careful planning resulted in every student being successful on their level. Approximate impact number(s): 18 classroom students for teaching objectives. 150 students for whole school activities. Social Justice Award Nasty Women Stephanie Borden and Lynn-Caelle Valere Course: SPC 1608H Honors Fundamentals of Oral Communication

Instructor: Dr. Christine Hanlon Community Partner: Planned Parenthood Planned Parenthoods mission is to ensure the right of all individuals to privately manage their sexual and reproductive health by providing medical services, education and advocacy. Although Planned Parenthood offers as many services to men, they focus on women and LGBTQ+ rights and services because they are the two groups most commonly denied proper reproductive healthcare. As active members of our society, Planned Parenthood provides support wherever we can at our clinics and in the community. Traversing the crowds of protesters that gather outside the clinic can be daunting for patients, which is why our escorts are the first face they see upon arrival so they know there are people willing to offer judgement-free support despite the protesters opposition. Supplying condoms, dental exams, and sex education via community seminars and our speeches encourages the practice of safe sex and ensures access to free contraception for everyone. Contacting our representatives is the easiest way to stoke real change in society by convincing the lawmakers that their constituents want reproductive health rights and for them to fight against legislation that tries to take that away. Working with Planned Parenthood has inspired within us a passion for social justice advocacy, a need to take civic responsibility and engage with the issues around us, and an appreciation for the impact education about reproductive rights and health has on making people more aware, safe, and capable of making decisions about their body. Together we have benefitted the lives of approximately 120 people. Technological Integration Award The KNIGHTS Student Run Free Clinic EMR Team

Clay Townsend, Haider Ali, Karla Salazar, and Rami Jason Bustami Course: Longitudinal Curricular Theme Faculty Members: Dr. Magdalena Pasarica and Dr. William Hardy Community Partner: Grace Medical Home The aim of the study is to improve screening, detection, and treatment of LTBI in KNIGHTS Clinic patients through questionnaires. Though many KNIGHTS Clinic patients had LTBI risk factors, they were rarely assessed previously for LTBI during visits. To increase LTBI screening, detection, and treatment, the following interventions were implemented: 1) A screening questionnaire for LTBI was adapted from CDC guidelines. 2) Medical students and providers received education on the need for screenings during meetings. 3) Questionnaires were administered to patients and responses were documented on record. 4) The rate of LTBI screening in patients immediately before and after the study was analyzed. 5) The rate of diagnostic testing for LTBI by purified protein derivative (PPD) in patients with risk factors was analyzed. 6) The feasibility of implementing a preventive screening questionnaire was qualitatively assessed. During the study, 43 out of 54 patients were screened for LTBI risk factors. Out of the screened patients, 16 (37.2%) were positive for LTBI risk factors. Overall, the educational and screening interventions were effective in increasing LTBI screening rates among KNIGHTS Clinic patients. The results of the present study support a recommendation for continued analysis of LTBI screening rates. Impact number: 43 patients were screened Engaging the Arts Award Aquaphonics Christopher Bible, Daniel Bonsignore, John-Mark George, Avery Lee, Max Loew, and Megan Turner

Course: BSC 3312 Principles of Marine Biology Instructor: Dr. Linda Walters and Christian Pilato Community Partner: Galileo School Sound is created when a mechanical event, such as knocking on a door, causes molecules to vibrate through different mediums. Sound can travel through solids, liquids, and air. However, other than it sounding different in a liquid medium, how sound propagates and travels through water effects many marine organisms. We will present the underwater noise phenomenon to Ms. Jessica Russells second grade class at the Galileo Gifted Charter School in Seminole County. We will introduce the concept of underwater noise and provide examples, such as a ship engine, whales, and dolphins using echolocation. We will discuss the characteristics of sound waves, how they are created, how they are processed by living organisms, and how air and water affect the audition of sound, then our attention will turn to underwater noise and how it works. We will look at the different noises that one can hear when diving or swimming underwater, such as the white noise that one hears and the ocean water rushing past as it pushes towards the shoreline. We will use sound samples to give our audience an immersive experience of sounds from the waves of the open ocean and those of the shallow waters to the lower depths of the deep sea. Finally, we will examine the effect of man-made noises sound originating from shipping operations, noises from cruise ships, and construction near shorelines on marine organisms. We hope to characterize the interaction between humans and marine life and how each manages to coexist with one another. Approximate impact number: 75 STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) Award

Coral Reefs Brandon Lee, Christian Rodriguez, Nicole Clark, Hannah Yucht, Dakota Carrera, and Daniel Martinez Course: BSC 3312 Principles of Marine Biology Instructor: Dr. Linda Walters Community Partner: Galileo School Coral reefs are complex, yet delicate, ecosystems that have high levels of biodiversity in our oceans, and provide ecological services to all of its inhabitants and surrounding areas. However, due to human impact, we have lost over 25% of our reefs and another 60% are currently threatened. Runoff is the greatest example of human impact; runoff can carry large quantities of sediment, often with high nutrient content, and other pollutants such as pesticides that are harmful when they encounter coral reef communities. Nutrient overload is another important cause of coral reef degradation and causes extensive algal growth. Other factors, such as overfishing, reduce natural grazing. This can result in high concentrations of plankton that block light penetration and inhibit photosynthesis by coral. Our service-learning project goal is to spread knowledge of the importance of coral reefs to 25 students in 1st grade at Galileo Elementary School. We taught them the importance of coral reefs with multiple hands-on activities in order to actively involve each student and guide them to help save our oceans. Students directly examined nutrient levels by using test kits for calcium, nitrates, and phosphates. This gave them a visual representation on a personal level. We also provided students with reusable bottles they can take everywhere and refill to avoid harmful plastic waste in our oceans. Inside the bottles, we put foam creatures to ensure an individualized connection, which will set them on the right path to save our reefs. Approximate impact number: Class size 25

14th Annual Service-Learning Student Showcase Scholarship Recipients 2017 Pedagogical Value Scholarship Powering through Puberty Abby Jones, Andria Dansby, Kerton Joseph, and Daniel Olszewski Course: NUR 4637L Public Health Nursing Instructor: Donna Breit Community Partner: Nap Ford Charter School Our community experience at Nap Ford Charter School focused primarily on educating 5 th grade students on the topic of puberty. Many of these students do not have proper access to education on puberty or have an adult they can trust to talk about this new topic with. As nursing students, we provided a safe environment for these students, allowed them to ask questions, and provided them with information on what to expect during puberty. Additionally, we met with 4 th graders at the same school and educated them on hygiene and self-esteem. This project met the objectives of our course, as we fulfilled a gap and an educational need in the community. Nap Ford Charter Schools mission statement is as follows: Believing that all students can learn and be successful members of society, the Nap Ford Community School will provide education programs and services, which foster academic success, health and wellness. Our project fell in line with their mission statement as it served as a health promotion tool to aid the well-being of these students. Approximate impact number: approximately 40 students Quality of Display Scholarship

UCF Angels Thaila Schug, Olivia Edstrom, and Nathan Faris Course: SPC 1608H Honors Fundamentals of Oral Communication Instructor: Dr. Christine Hanlon Community Partner: Give Kids the World Chug a chug a choo choo!! This is the sound of the train at Give Kids the World, a place where kids who are a part of the Make a Wish Foundation come to use their wish on one of the major theme parks in Orlando. As volunteers, we help to make this possible. By volunteering, we had the opportunity to create the smiles on those kids faces, and if that was through being the train conductor, riding with a miracle child on Loris Magical Flight (a Dumbo inspired ride), or even being a part of the life sized Candy Land game, we all had the opportunity to make a difference at Give Kids the World. The community in need are these families who need just one week away from surgeries, needles, and disappointments. Our servicelearning benefited not only them, but ourselves, too, because it helped give sustenance to our speeches with experiences we had and/or people we talked to. The learning objectives of our Fundamentals of Oral Communications class were met through our service there because we were able to recognize the impact of cultural diversity in each family, we had to dig deeper into the history of Give Kids the World for our presentations so we did research and interviewed staff members, and we presented all of our experiences in an extemporaneous way. These were just some of the many objectives we completed in our class through our service-learning experience at Give Kids the World. Approximate impact numbers: Give Kids the World has granted wishes from 76 different countries, 143,059 wishes had been granted in between 1986-2015, 150,000 kids have come to stay there, and 3,000,000 volunteer hours were accounted for from 25,000 different volunteers (information cited from the official site of Give Kids the World). Thaila Schug has impacted approximately 30 individuals when being an assistant photographer (recording the memories for families), 25 people being a concierge for the dining hall where she made them feel welcome, and 15 people when she

worked on Loris Magical Flight (where she connected on a deeper level with each family). Olivia Edstrom impacted 10 individuals when working at La Di Da Spa (applying temporary tattoos and painting nails), 50 individuals when being a part of the Winter Wonderland Parade, and 60 people when giving of her time to be a delivery person for Caf Clayton. Nathan Faris impacted 25 people when running J.Js Express and Loris Magical Ride, and he impacted 75 people when being the ride operator for Loris Magical Ride (where he was able to connect with multiple families). Value to Agency & Community Scholarship Aspire to Inspire STEM Tiffany Gilliard, Victoria James, and Kirsten Williams Course: HSC 4906 Independent Study Instructor: Dr. Danielle Webster Community Partner: The Society for Scientific Advancement (SoSA) The Independent Study course (HSC 4906) is designed to help students develop the skills and perspectives for organizing and executing outreach programs targeting schools in underserved socioeconomic areas. Students enrolled create a fictional non-profit organization with community outreach programmatic activities. They also collaborated to execute a workshop that directly contributes to the mission of an existing organization, The Society for Scientific Advancement (SoSA). SoSAs mission is to use science as a tool to facilitate the development of emerging economies in the Caribbean. SoSA hosts the annual STEM Talent Expansion Through Promotion of Science (S.T.E.P.S.) workshop as its primary outreach program in Kingston, Jamaica. Enrolled students had the opportunity to put course theory into action by volunteering as teachers for SoSAs 2016 S.T.E.P.S. workshop.

During the course, we collaborated to develop a laboratory manual of cutting-edge science experiments used during the S.T.E.P.S. workshop. The laboratory manual was crafted with experimental questions and specific learning objectives related to physical science topics to actively engage students. We provided Jamaican elementary and middle school-age students underperforming in the STEM discipline with rewarding scientific experiences to increase their interest in science and education. We were surprised how much we could inspire with so little and are thankful to have had the opportunity to build on our cultural awareness, innovation and project management knowledge and skills through this course. Further, this course allowed for a better understanding of a curriculum and major and how instructing others can aid in understanding our fields of study beyond the course. Approximate impact numbers: 124 primary students and 80 secondary students were served (204 total students) Caliber of Reflection Scholarship Journeys End Volunteers Sam Kleiner, Sean Adams, and Mary Kniepmann Course: SPC 1608H Honors Fundamentals of Oral Communication Instructor: Dr. Christine Hanlon Community Partner: Journeys End Animal Sanctuary We worked with Journeys End Animal Sanctuary for our service-learning project. Journeys End is a sanctuary for unadoptable, physically disabled animals to live out their days while living as close to a normal life as possible. We aimed to help animals that were not getting the love and affection of normal, physically healthy animals. We would pet and play with the animals, brush them, and show them to others at animal festivals. Our

experience with Journeys End, specifically the DeLand Pet Festival, allowed us to gain experience with presenting ideas to an audience. We were able to apply the course material in order to accomplish our goals of both informing the various audiences about the mission of Journeys End, and persuading them to donate to the sanctuary, as it runs solely on donations. The various duties we performed with Journeys End allowed us to directly make a change in the community while also effectively applying the course objectives. Approximate impact number: Each of us interacted with 18-20 animals regularly, and the sanctuary regularly helps around 275 animals. In addition, the sanctuary regularly helps approximately 10 people with disabilities / criminal history who would not be able to find employment elsewhere. Enhancement of Civic Responsibility Scholarship Lets Talk Trees Suraj Singireddy Course: SPC 1608 H Honors Fundamentals of Oral Communication Instructor: Dr. Christine Hanlon Community Partner: Kelsie Johnson, UCF Arboretum As part of a service-learning course, I volunteered to run an informational booth for the UCF Arboretum. The Arboretum's goal is to "become a leading center that serves the needs of the Central Florida community by creating and fostering partnerships to advance ecological knowledge, promote natural resource conservation, and support human and environmental well-being." In order to inform students about the Arboretum's resources and opportunities, we spent two and a half hours every other Monday setting up and answering students' questions about the Arboretum. These opportunities include volunteering at the Arboretum's greenhouse or plant beds and

events held periodically throughout the semester to teach students about the environment and the ways in which they can interact with it safely. Peer Choice Scholarship KNIGHTS Clinic Physician Referrals Stacey Lee and Syed Hamad Sagheer Course: Longitudinal Curricular Theme Instructors: Dr. Magdalena Pasarica and Dr. Judith Simms-Cendan Community Partner: Grace Medical Home The KNIGHTS (Keeping Neighbors in Good Health Through Service) Clinic is a student-run free clinic coordinated by medical students and staffed by volunteers from medicine, pharmacy, social work, etc. Physician Recruitment Co-Directors are responsible for scheduling and communicating with physicians and ensuring physician satisfaction. Our underserved patient population demonstrated an unmet need for continuity in specialist care and social work. We also determined that our volunteer physicians were being overbooked. Within the past year, several protocols were implemented to address these problems. The total number of physicians volunteering was increased from 13 to 21 physicians (+61%). In addition to the nine specialties previously offered, psychiatry, otolaryngology, urology, rheumatology, dermatology, and infectious diseases were added; we also recruited social work faculty and students. Scheduling physicians three to seven months prior to their clinic date and sending out Microsoft Outlook calendar invites increased patient follow-up planning and generated positive physician feedback. Offering CME credits for volunteering contributed to more effective physician recruitment and satisfaction; eleven physicians have received a total of 53.5 CME credits for 323 hours of volunteering to date. The average number of physicians and patients per clinic increased from 3.05 to

3.81 (+25%) and 5.90 to 6.75 (+14.4%), respectively, while the average number of patients seen per physician per clinic decreased from 1.93 to 1.77 (8.3%). These interventions have increased clinic operation efficiency and patient care at the KNIGHTS Clinic. These principles may be applied to other clinics to improve quality of care. Approximate impact numbers: Clinic Nights: 20 Total patients: 122 Graduate Innovative Project Scholarship KNIGHTS Clinic Volunteer Coordinators Saskia Groenewald, Colin Kruger, Yi Luo, and Michelle McGee Course: Longitudinal Curricular Theme Instructors: Dr. Judith Simms-Cendan and Dr. Magdalena Pasarica Community Partners: KNIGHTS Clinic and Grace Medical Home The KNIGHTS Clinic is a student-run free clinic at the UCF College of Medicine. It utilizes interdisciplinary teams to provide health care, including preventative services, social services, and referrals for the underserved population of Orlando and neighboring communities. The clinic has seen a decline in attendance of third and fourth year students due to increased workload and away rotations. It was important that these issues be addressed to ensure the clinic runs as smoothly as possible. To increase participation, we have 1) created availability surveys, 2) initiated a collaborative effort with the internal medicine/family medicine

(IM/FM) clerkship at UCF COM, 3) implemented text message notifications for upperclassmen volunteers, and 4) utilized KNIGHTS Clinic Active Volunteer Facebook group to find replacement volunteers. Data was collected from archived records from the past 30 months. The records show the number of 3 rd year volunteers went from 51 in 2015 to 100 in 2017. The number of 4th year volunteers in 2015 went from 31 to 114 in 2017. Data was also collected on the number of cancellations by 3rd and 4th year students over 15 months. There were 4.75 average cancellations per night before IM/FM integration and an average of 1.19 cancellations per night after IM/FM integration. This study has shown that through availability surveys, collaboration with the UCF COM IM/FM clerkship, and alternative forms of communication, volunteer participation has greatly increased and cancellations are minimized. The changes that have been made could be applied at similar clinic models having difficulty with recruitment. Approximate impact numbers: 2016-2017: 122 patients increased from 114 in the previous year; Clinic Dates: 21; Upperclassman volunteers: 214 increased from 154 the previous year Undergraduate Innovative Project Scholarship Unwelcomed Guests Traci Hill, Tristan Whittaker, Marissa Dear, Briana McIntosh, Edward Uliani, Kristan McGovern, and Renee Brown Course: BSC 3312 Principles of Marine Biology Instructor: Dr. Linda Walters Community Partner: Patricia Lachance, Sunrise Elementary School, Orange County Public Schools

Invasive species are unwanted environmental guests that are not going away. This problem plagues our native habitats, including both coastlines of Florida. Invasive species find themselves in new places in a variety of ways, most significantly boating and the aquarium trade. To reduce the number of new species introduced by humans, we need to educate people on how to not be vectors. Our team has arranged to go to Sunrise Elementary, a public school in Orange County, to present information about Florida's invasive species to two fifth-grade classes. Our first activity will be a slide show challenge. Each slide will contain a photo of an organism and then the students will question us on the organism trying to decide whether it is native or invasive. We will then reveal the correct answer and tell the students the scientific and common names, as well as unique facts about each species. The second activity will be a relay race where students will work to remove invasive species from their ocean. The students will now try to remove only invasive species from their pool. Points will be assigned to adults and juveniles. Finally, we will send each fifth-grader home with an activity book they can share with their families. As experts in the field of marine biology, it is our responsibility to share our knowledge by teaching others. We will develop our communication skills as scientists, by helping the fifth-grade teachers bring new excitement and inspire families to share our message. Approximate impact numbers: We plan to present information on invasive species and solutions to at least two classes of 22 fifth grade students, totaling 44 students. We expect each student to share their activity book with their families. If we count each family with 4 members including the student, 44 X 3 = 132 people impacted. Graduate Leadership Scholarship Endo Enthusiasts Haley Boyle, Megan Elliott, Olivia Chase, John Adam Green, and Dhana Concepcion

Course: NUR 4637L Public Health Nursing Instructor: Dr. Heather Peralta Community Partner: Wekiva High School As nursing students, a vital part of our careers involves community health and education. Endometriosis affects one out of every ten women of reproductive age, and the average time it takes to diagnose is ten years, during which, women experience excruciating and debilitating pain. Our community outreach project involved going to Wekiva High School and educating students on the signs and symptoms of endometriosis, as well as the importance of being able to identify warning signs in friends and family members. Students learned through PowerPoints, skits, and games, and were then able to answer questions on what endometriosis is, why it is important for both sexes to be educated on the topic, and how to reach out to someone for help. The PowerPoint presentation gave them the straightforward information, the skit gave them a case study to show the effects of endometriosis on a persons life, and the games got students involved in the learning so they could answer trivia questions and test their knowledge. Following our presentation, male students could identify the importance of identifying the symptoms in girlfriends and wives as it could affect their ability to start a family since endometriosis can lead to infertility. Students reported back that they had learned a great deal and that they had known very little about how many people endometriosis affected each year and how difficult it can be to diagnose prior to our presentation. They reported feeling more confident about the topic and recognizing the importance of womens health. Approximate impact number: 470 Undergraduate Leadership Scholarship

H4H Orlando Theodoro Meza, James Chang, and Elizabeth Aguilar Course: LDR 3950 Leadership in Action: Capstone Experience for LEAD Scholars and LDR 3215 Advanced Leadership through Service Instructor: Dr. Germayne Graham and Angela Newland Community Partner: Hearts for the Homeless Orlando My group and I individually wished to acknowledge a side of our community that is largely ignored and underserved. Our efforts and paths crossed when we all joined Hearts for the Homeless Orlando, a group formed recently within UCF made up of another 70 members. We felt that their mission: Contribut[ing] to the health and well-being of one of the most vulnerable populations in our nation with free blood pressure screenings, education, and by providing clinical outreach opportunities for students who wish to contribute to our effort aligned very well with our values and leadership styles. Our initiatives along with Hearts for the Homeless significantly impacted the Homeless population, with the growing 450+ screenings we have provided for them. On top of the service, we purposefully educate and interact with them so they get more than just numbers, they receive insightful health info and a friendly conversation. Inversely, our organization provides students the opportunity to take an active role in their community, each screening is a new story, an addition to the monolith we call our captain's log. In addition to our regular visits, we held a clothing drive that raised 566 articles of clothing during the winter season that served the homeless population. This project connected to course objectives by allowing us to establish our identities as leaders by taking more responsibilities as Directors for the Vice-President, Treasurer, Medical Information Officer. In doing this, we learned to examine the skills needed to lead change in our communities. Approximate impact number: 456

Capacity Building Scholarship KNIGHTS Clinic Zachery Thompson and Rajib Chowdhury Course: Longitudinal Curricular Theme Instructor: Dr. Magdelena Pasarica Community Partners: Grace Medical Home and Diebel Legacy Fund at Central Florida Foundation Introduction: The KNIGHTS Clinic funded by the Diebel Legacy Fund at Central Florida Foundation is the University of Central Floridas medical student-run clinic, providing a medical home for the underserved in Orlando. Students work in interdisciplinary teams under the supervision of physicians to provide various health care services such as health education, case management, and appropriate referrals to community resources. Problem: P1) To improve patient satisfaction by increasing the variety of comprehensive health services without a significant increase in visit times. P2) To improve areas of inefficient communication between the KNIGHTS clinic staff. Interventions: P1): 1A) Integrating social work providers into our multi-disciplinary team 1B) Making patient education mandatory for all patients P2): 2A) Decreasing the length of the required patient packet, from five forms to two 2B) Providing a checklist detailing clinic flow to volunteers to increase clinic operational efficiency

2C) Enhancing and streamlining communication via email accounts for each board position Results: We saw an average of 6.9 patients/clinic, an increase from 5.66 patients/clinic the previous year. Although visit times increased to an average of 98 minutes from 91 minutes, we provided patients with additional services such as social work and patient education, promoting overall patient wellbeing. Conclusion: Our interventions resulted in significant improvements such as additional, beneficial, and comprehensive services to patients without appreciably increasing visit times. In the future, similar interventions can be applied to other similar clinics to increase the number of patients seen and to foster the education of future medical professionals. Engaging Community Online Scholarship Christian Pizarro Course: SOP 3723 Cross-Cultural Psychology Faculty Member: Dr. Martha Hubertz Community Partners: Orlando Baptist Church For my service-learning project this semester, I volunteered at Orlando Baptist Church, specifically with Alive Orlando, which was the student ministry at the church. My goal for this was to find an organization that made a difference in the community and developed relationships. The mission statement that this organization has is based on changing the world. They want to develop children, teenagers, and adults to be equipped to impact those that are around them and around the globe. I knew that I wanted to make an impact on students lives, but when I first started volunteering, I was not sure what I was getting myself into. As the

days and weeks went by, I started to develop a relationship with the students there. The student pastor noticed and he appointed me to be a lead mentor to the 7th Grade Boys. Those boys impacted my life in ways that they dont know. I had first started by doing errands, but eventually I became an integrated piece in the organization. I not only helped by being a mentor, but I was able to make an impact on the weekly service by assisting the music department and organizing the service. The mission of this organization is to change the world, and they did in a significant way. This is a group made up of diverse people and cultures. I was able to understand their behaviors. It was different than what I was expected and today I continue to volunteer in the organization. Approximate impact number of students in organization: 90 Literacy Engagement Scholarship Creating Hope and Providing Opportunity Emareli Gonzalez Course: SOP 3723 Instructor: Dr. Martha Hubertz Community Partner: Ministerio Resturaction y Esperanza My service-learning project has embedded the importance of help others. I intend to work tirelessly helping those in need. I have learned that in order to bring about change and see something get done it must start with myself. I plan on providing assistants to many of those individuals who have immigrated to our land of opportunity for a remote chance of a better life for themselves and their children. We are currently experiencing a great deal of controversy on the bases of immigration which can adversely impact the lives of many individuals.

I am a member of a community that is offering support and guidance, as to the resources/tools that they will need in order to fulfill their aspirations for a better life. Within my community we have been working diligently assisting members in learning how to speak, read, and write English. We have also coordinated food drives, donations of material goods, financial literacy workshops, and assistance with applying for asylum. What I have taken from this experience is that we mustnt forget that we are all human beings different in attributes, personalities, and intellect; yet with a common desire to do better for ourselves, our families and future generations. Many of our Nations greatest leaders came to that realization early on and did everything they could to help bring about the changes that our nation so desperately needed. It isnt simply about learning how to get along with one another but learning how to work together. Significant Impact Scholarship Legends Academy Alexander Bulnes, Talysia Ellis, Greg Illig, and Christine Whitwam Course: NUR 3637L Public Health Nursing Instructor: Donna Breit Community Partner: Legends Academy The philosophy of Legends Academy is to create a culturally responsive and safe learning-environment. Their goal to help the students grow into well-rounded, educated and unique individuals is what allowed us to collaborate with them for this project. As future nurses, we have a responsibility to care and advocate for the health of those in our community. Our service-learning project involved teaching 5th and 6th Graders about the physical, mental, and emotional changes occurring throughout their bodies as they experience puberty.

By splitting up the boys and girls, our team was able to create an atmosphere suited for the teaching and discussion of the different changes affecting the lives of approximately seventy students. Weekly lesson plans were developed, evaluated and revised to allow the students to be knowledgeable about correct anatomical terminology, understanding of the physiology behind their development, and confident in knowing that the changes they experience are normal. To keep the students engaged, a number of tools were used throughout the lessons, including PowerPoints, videos, interactive models, games and hand-outs. We made an impact by teaching this sensitive subject in a culturally and developmentally appropriate way to a population that might have never otherwise received this critical knowledge about their bodies. Approximate impact number: 70 Environmental Sustainability Scholarship Environmental Stewards at Nambiti Marielena Burdge, Andrew Abreu, Kasey DeHaan, and Jacqueline Meyer Course: IDH 3955H Study Abroad Honors South Africa Instructors: Mike Callahan and Lesanne Brunswick Community Partner: Nambiti Game Reserve in KwaZulu Natal, South Africa Service-learning projects completed at the Nambiti Big 5 Game Reserve in South Africa included removing invasive wattle trees; dehorning and monitoring white rhinos to prevent poaching and illegal trade; acacia tree surveys to monitor and evaluate damage from elephants; and installing wildlife cameras to monitor and study the reserves leopard population. As a result of these projects, the reserve has a more robust dataset of acacia tree damage and biomass, a consistent record of leopard activity within the reserve, a stronger defense against rhino poaching, and a more healthy, native ecosystem for its animal and plant residents. These projects are designed to meet the ecological needs of the 40 animal species that live on

the reserve and enhance the tireless conservation efforts of the Nambiti staff. They are also consistent with Nambitis mission of preserving and enhancing its ecosystem and wildlife habitat through science and community partnerships. Additionally, the implemented projects met our learning objectives, which were to understand history, economics, and sustainability of South Africa, as well as to appreciate environmental challenges and work to improve conditions at the Nambiti Game Reserve. Approximate impact numbers: Projects at Nambiti were responsible for removing 20 invasive trees, surveying one thousand acres of acacia trees, dehorning 3 white rhinos, and setting up 11 leopard research cameras and dispersing leopard attractant across the 22,000 acres of the reserve. These projects benefitted the staff of 9 lodges in Nambiti and enhanced the habitat of the 40 animal species that live on the reserve. Economic Sustainability Scholarship KNIGHTS Student-Run Free Clinic Pharmacy Terah Hennick, Jason Day, Elizabeth Murphy, Sina Koochakzadeh, Ambika Anand, Jeffrey Chen, Christina Dai, Punnavit Harimtepathip, Heather Lesch, Anne Liu, Shazia Majid, Michael Mankbadi, Michelle McGee, and Colby Skinner Course: Longitudinal Curricular Theme Instructor: Dr. Magdalena Pasarica Community Partner: Grace Medical Home Introduction: Medical students at the University of Central Florida College of Medicine, along with affiliated and volunteer physicians and staff, and pharmacy students at the University of Florida College of Pharmacy work together to coordinate the KNIGHTS Clinic (Keeping Neighbors In Good Health Through Service) student-run free clinic. The KNIGHTS Clinic is funded by the Diebel Legacy Fund at Central Florida Foundation. The student volunteers in the dispensary work directly with University of Florida pharmacy students to provide medication education, monitor patient

medications, and dispense necessary prescriptions for KNIGHTS Clinic patients. Problem: Donated pharmaceutical agents in our clinics dispensary were either not fully utilized before expiration, or were insufficiently distributed for the clinics needs. Lack of a proper inventory and a dispensary record contributed significantly to this problem. The purpose of this study is to identify which medications are in high demand and which medications are underutilized to guide physician decision making as well as donations. Intervention: The medications dispensed at 12 clinic nights were recorded and categorized as follows: allergy, hypertension, diabetes, neurological, respiratory, contraceptive, and anti-inflammatory. These same drugs were then recorded to create an electronic inventory to track medication utilization. These two sets of data were compared to evaluate which medications are utilized more often for the patient population seen at the clinic. Results: Dispensed medications from 12 clinic dates yielded the following dispensed medication results: 13 allergy, 2 hypertension, 6 neurological, 18 respiratory, 13 contraceptive, 2 anti-inflammatory, and 3 hypercholesterolemia medications. The additional available medications in the dispensary that were not dispensed in the studied dates included antimicrobials, anticoagulants, diabetes, antiemetics, proton pump inhibitors, gastrointestinal, steroids, and smoking cessation medications. One limitation of this study is the everyday utilization of the medication supply alters the inventory status which requires significant upkeep. Conclusion: Based on the results, the KNIGHTS Clinic could obtain more allergy, respiratory, contraceptive, and neurological medications to improve patient care and satisfaction. Information regarding medication sample frequency of usage will be relayed to donors to improve the clinics medication inventory. Currently, the clinic director provides a brief orientation to providers prior to the start of the clinic to increase utilization of available medications. The newly developed inventory can be used to augment the clinic directors orientation to providers regarding available medications. Future work will include tracking medications that were requested but unavailable. This information could be used to inform suppliers and better meet the medication needs of our patients. Also, the costs of utilized medications could be calculated to determine how much money

patients save through our medication dispensing system. Approximate impact numbers: Clinic Nights (03/14-03/15): 18 Total Patients: 47 Appointments ($ I La-C8 / t5) : 116 Social Sustainability Scholarship Sustainability Initiative in Intabazwe, South Africa Marielena Burdge, Selena Houck, Danille Dickey, Zachary Good, and Lisa Goldsworthy Course: IDH 3955H Study Abroad Honors South Africa Instructors: Michael Callahan and Lesanne Brunswick Community Partners: Nkosinathi Community Center in Intabazwe, South Africa In May 2016, eight students from the Burnett Honors College traveled to South Africa in order to implement various sustainability projects focused on education, health, and technology, among other concentrations. The South Africa Honors Abroad Program is a collaboration with community partners in South Africa, addressing their specific needs while giving students valuable leadership, fundraising, and service experience. In preparation for this month-long service-learning experience, they raised over $10,000 during the Spring 2016 semester. Once in South Africa, they traveled to the township of Intabazwe to begin their collaboration with the Nkosinathi Community Center. Students brought $660 worth of donated medical supplies and worked with about 200 locals to educate the community on basic health and hygiene practices. In order to improve sanitation, a greywater drainage pipe was installed. The students raised $250 for supplies and books for the orphanages school, as well as provided about 14

school uniforms to allow older students to attend public school. Another education project implemented was providing Kindles for students to share, servicing about 50 students. This gave them access to books in Zulu as well as English. In order to power the Kindles and the Community Center as a whole, one student installed portable solar panels to expand the centers access to power. One student worked with Dressed in Hope to procure dresses for about 250 young girls. This was foremost a partnership, and in helping to improve sustainability within the township we learned about another culture and formed meaningful bonds with the locals. Approximate impact numbers: Dressed in Hope Project: 250 people/$0; Kindle/Education Project 50 people/$418, health education project 200 people/$100, Project C.U.R.E. supplies 500 people/$660, Portable Solar Panels: $1,177 , School Supplies: $250/50 people, Uniforms: $350/14 people Youth Development Scholarship Aquaculture AFISHianados Aiesha Kate-Linn Stevens, Dakota Michelle Lewis, Tanya Imam, Katherine Paige Harris, and Elizabeth Abney Course: BSC 3312 Principles of Marine Biology Instructor: Dr. Linda Walters Community Partner: Markham Woods Middle School As the population of our planet continues to grow, the need to increase output of protein-based foods that minimally affect the environment will be paramount. Currently, The State of World Fisheries and Aquaculture reports that approximately one-third of commercial fish stocks are in a biologically unsustainable state (FAO 2016). Aquaculture provides an opportunity to farm fish and shellfish in a controlled environment, allowing

for wild populations to return to sustainable levels. With this service-learning project, we hope to increase awareness of the importance of sustainable seafood consumption. In our Principles of Marine Biology class (BSC 3312), we have spent the semester becoming experts in the pros and cons of aquaculture. We shared this information and practiced our science communication skills with students at Markham Woods Middle School. After describing the importance of aquaculture we played a game we developed involving multiple pools of fish to represent the harvesting of fish in aquaculture versus the open ocean and some of the challenges that may arise. Using two pools, students competed to see which group could harvest the most fish. As harvesting occurred by students catching the fish, invasive species and diseases were unexpectedly introduced to the sampled populations. We hope to emphasize the pros and cons of aquaculture with this presentation. By providing students with printed information about sustainable seafood consumption to take to their families, we were able to reach over 100 individuals. This service-learning project has given us the opportunity to practice communicating scientific information to an audience of different ages. Having the opportunity to have educated a young audience about our passions has given us a sense of fulfillment that we are helping preserve and protect our marine environment. Excellence in The Burnett Honors College Scholarship Knights Working with Lions Edward Wagner Course: SPC 1608H Honors Fundamentals of Oral Communication Instructor: Dr. Christine Hanlon

Community Partner: The Lions Club of Oviedo and Winter Springs The motto of the Lions Club is We Serve. Through this class, and my service with the Lions Club, I have learned how I can serve the world around me, even through small actions such as cleaning and sorting donated pairs of glasses. The project that I worked on with the Lions Club was Project Right to Sight. What I learned from this experience is how the small things that I did to help the Lions Club have an impact all over the world. For example, one day I helped to clean and organize 1,000 reading glasses to be sent to missions in Mexico and the Philippines. As someone who needs glasses, I know how much of a difference that something as small as glasses can make in a persons life. And with the Lions Club I can make that change happen for people all over the world. Approximate impact number: 2,000 pairs of glasses 100 people indirectly impacted personally 2,000 people impacted by Lions Club Excellence in the College of Education and Human Performance Scholarship NPS Instructional Designers Shane Roopnarine and Ashley Smith Course: EME 6613 Instructional System Design Instructor: Dr. Atsusi 2c Hirumi Community Partner: National Park Service

The National Park Service (NPS) turned 100 years old in 2016. In addition to the preservation of natural resources and places, the NPS is responsible for the maintenance of nationally and culturally significant structures across its sites. This includes everything from well-known national monuments to simple storage facilities with historic features. Management and upkeep for these facilities falls to NPS facilities management specialists and skilled tradespeople (e.g. historic architects, cultural specialists, and others). A key challenge for the NPS is training their staff to assess, document, and manage historic assets. Our service-learning project focused on applying an instructional systems approach to developing training resources for the NPS, our client. Working with our subject matter experts at the NPS, we conducted learner and goal analyses, developed an instructional treatment plan, and completed initial storyboarding for key sections of our training. Each of these activities is linked to a major course objective, including demonstrating effective interpersonal skills and communications while working with our teammates and client. Students working on this project had an opportunity to address an authentic training problem while gaining hands-on experience as part of an instructional systems design team. At the end of the semester, our teams delivered materials to support four units of instruction. Our products will serve as the blueprint for developing the rest of the training program. Excellence in the College of Graduate Studies Scholarship Down Syndrome National Conference Sara Brownstein, Jamie Hansen, and Emily Hagan Course: SPA 6559 Augmentative and Alternative Communication

Instructor: Dr. Nancy Harrington Community Partner: National Down Syndrome Congress Every year, thousands of people from all over the world attend the National Down Syndrome Convention. The convention is a three day event in which people of all ages with Down syndrome and their families get to interact, become empowered and overall have an amazing time with people that they can relate to. Professionals and experts in the field come to run workshops for the three day event. My class was extremely lucky and fortunate that during summer 2016 the convention happened to be in Orlando, Florida and our service-learning project was to spend all three days at the convention as volunteers. The National Down Syndrome Conference is impossible without the volunteers since many of these individuals need assistance and personal attention 24/7. The parents of these individuals have their own workshops all day during the convention so it is up to the volunteers to monitor the individuals and help enhance their experience. During the convention two students were put in charge of eight individuals with Down syndrome. Our main responsibilities were to spend all three days with these individuals and help them with whatever was needed. We also had schedules and needed to get the participants to all the correct workshops. The most interesting part of our job, however, was to create and utilize individualized alternative and augmentative communication to help these individuals communicate better at the convention. Since we are masters students in the field of communication science and disorders we got the chance to utilize many skills and theories that we were learning in class. Many of us made visual schedules, pace boards, yes no cards, and pictures that would assist the participants at the convention. Some groups utilized I-PAD applications that assisted with communication as well. The convention was an amazing success and the directors said it could not have been possible without the UCF volunteers. Excellence in the College of Health & Public Affairs Scholarship

Maegan Hershner Course: SPC 1608H Honors Fundamentals of Oral Communication Instructor: Dr. Christine Hanlon Community Partner: Catalina Elementary School For my service-learning project, I have worked at Catalina Elementary School in the ESE, or special-education classrooms. Students who are in the ESE classes have a disability that makes it difficult for them to succeed in a general education classroom. Catalina Elementary is a Title 1 school, and 100% of the students receive free breakfast and lunch due to the high level of poverty. When I am at Catalina Elementary School, I am usually with the Kindergarten through 2nd grade ESE class. I work with the students in small groups and one-on-one. The ESE classes at Catalina Elementary need as much support as possible, and I am able to provide additional support in the classrooms by being an extra pair of hands, and by completing assessments and activities that the teachers do not have time to do. My experience working in the ESE classrooms at Catalina Elementary School has helped me to meet the learning objectives of SPC 1608H because it enables me to speak on behalf of the ESE classes in my speeches for my course, and helps me to create and deliver effective speeches. The mission of Catalina Elementary School is to equip their students with the necessary skills and knowledge to become future leaders. Through working with Catalina Elementary School, I have directly impacted 35 students in the ESE classes, 10 students in the K-2 ESE classroom, and I have served over 300 hours at Catalina Elementary School this school year. Excellence in the College of Medicine Scholarship

KNIGHTS Clinic Volunteer Coordinators Saskia Groenewald, Colin Kruger, Yi Luo, and Michelle McGee Course: Longitudinal Curricular Theme Instructors: Dr. Judith Simms-Cendan and Dr. Magdalena Pasarica Community Partners: KNIGHTS Clinic and Grace Medical Home The KNIGHTS Clinic is a student-run free clinic at the UCF College of Medicine. It utilizes interdisciplinary teams to provide health care, including preventative services, social services, and referrals for the underserved population of Orlando and neighboring communities. The clinic has seen a decline in attendance of third and fourth year students due to increased workload and away rotations. It was important that these issues be addressed to ensure the clinic runs as smoothly as possible. To increase participation, we have 1) created availability surveys, 2) initiated a collaborative effort with the internal medicine/family medicine (IM/FM) clerkship at UCF COM, 3) implemented text message notifications for upperclassmen volunteers, and 4) utilized KNIGHTS Clinic Active Volunteer Facebook group to find replacement volunteers. Data was collected from archived records from the past 30 months. The records show the number of 3 rd year volunteers went from 51 in 2015 to 100 in 2017. The number of 4th year volunteers in 2015 went from 31 to 114 in 2017. Data was also collected on the number of cancellations by 3 rd and 4th year students over 15 months. There were 4.75 average cancellations per night before IM/FM integration and an average of 1.19 cancellations per night after IM/FM integration. This study has shown that through availability surveys, collaboration with the UCF COM IM/FM clerkship, and alternative forms of communication, volunteer participation has greatly increased and cancellations are minimized. The changes that have been made could be applied at similar clinic models having difficulty with recruitment.

Approximate impact numbers: 2016-2017: 122 patients increased from 114 in the previous year; Clinic Dates: 21; Upperclassman volunteers: 214 increased from 154 the previous year Excellence in the College of Nursing Scholarship Parramore Knights Cassandra Bajoo and Margot Lagardera Course: NUR 4637L Public Health Nursing Instructor: Donna Breit Community Partner: Grand Avenue Elementary Our service-learning project was conducted at the Grand Avenue Headstart located in Parramore. We had the opportunity to teach Headstart and Pre-K children, ranging from the ages of 3 to 5, about different health related topics to help them live healthier lives. We were exited to be apart of their learning experience. It was humbling and rewarding to be able to service a community whose members have limited access to resources. Our health promotions projects empowered the community members through the use of primary prevention. This was done through education of various topics such as: hand washing, stranger danger, safety, hands are not for hitting, nutrition, and dental hygiene. The overall goal of these projects was to ultimately have the children engage in healthy behaviors that will reduce their risk in the future for developing diseases while enhancing their quality of life. Our projects included many hands on activities that we believe were appropriate for their developmental level. We thought it was vital to include many hands on activities because this allows children to use their creativity while developing their imagination, physical, cognitive, and emotional strength.

We met our course objectives by assessing the needs of the students through discussion of major community issues with school faculty. This allowed us to determine what health topics were necessary to implement. We taught a total of about 60 students while supporting their mission statement, which is To lead our students to success with the support and involvement of families and the community Excellence in the College of Sciences Scholarship 71) Bye-Bye By-Catch Xena Abella, Gina Gomez, Dominique Gray, Sarah Hart, Melinda Paduani, John Sinnott, and Johnny Wilke Course: BSC 3312 Principles of Marine Biology Instructor: Dr. Linda Walters Community Partner: Ms. Kay Borglum, Sanford Middle School For Spring 2017 our group participated in a service-learning project in which we presented a marine biology topic to a middle school class in Seminole County. In addition to enhancing public understanding of a pertinent scientific topic, this project was a valuable opportunity to improve our communication skills and inspire a younger generation of scientists. Our group presented the subject of overharvesting to a class of 25 students taught by Ms. Kay Borglum at Sanford Middle School. The multifarious consumer products made from marine organisms create a high demand on wild-caught marine fisheries. Overharvesting drastically reduces target populations and long-term yields and represents a significant threat to non-target species through both by-catch and ecosystem degradation. We had three primary goals for our presentation: 1) educate the students on practices that contribute to overharvesting, 2) discuss policies that would facilitate sustainable fisheries, and 3) provide ways that they themselves could support sustainable fisheries. With

approximately 85% of the worlds fisheries being fully exploited, over exploited, depleted, or recovering from depletion, educational initiatives like ours are of ever-increasing importance. By nurturing interest in overharvesting, our service-learning project impacts these 25 students and, potentially, their families. For communities around the globe, overharvesting may have dire consequences if corrective actions are not taken. Service-Learning projects such as this one will play a key role in inducing the positive changes in our consumption patterns that may solve the environmental crisis of overharvesting. Approximate impact number: 25+ Excellence in Interdisciplinary Studies Scholarship H4H Orlando Theodoro Meza, James Chang, and Elizabeth Aguilar Course: LDR 3950 Leadership in Action: Capstone Experience for LEAD Scholars and LDR 3215 Advanced Leadership through Service Instructor: Dr. Germayne Graham and Angela Newland Community Partner: Hearts for the Homeless Orlando My group and I individually wished to acknowledge a side of our community that is largely ignored and underserved. Our efforts and paths crossed when we all joined Hearts for the Homeless Orlando, a group formed recently within UCF made up of another 70 members. We felt that their mission: Contribut[ing] to the health and well-being of one of the most vulnerable populations in our nation with free blood pressure screenings, education, and by providing clinical outreach opportunities for students who wish to contribute to our effort aligned very well with our values and leadership styles. Our initiatives along with Hearts for the Homeless significantly impacted the Homeless population, with the

growing 450+ screenings we have provided for them. On top of the service, we purposefully educate and interact with them so they get more than just numbers, they receive insightful health info and a friendly conversation. Inversely, our organization provides students the opportunity to take an active role in their community, each screening is a new story, an addition to the monolith we call our captain's log. In addition to our regular visits, we held a clothing drive that raised 566 articles of clothing during the winter season that served the homeless population.This project connected to course objectives by allowing us to establish our identities as leaders by taking more responsibilities as Directors for the Vice-President, Treasurer, Medical Information Officer. In doing this, we learned to examine the skills needed to lead change in our communities. Approximate impact number: 456 Experiential Learning Scholarship Sustainability Initiative in Intabazwe, South Africa Marielena Burdge, Selena Houck, Danille Dickey, Zachary Good, and Lisa Goldsworthy Course: IDH 3955H Study Abroad Honors South Africa Instructors: Michael Callahan and Lesanne Brunswick Community Partners: Nkosinathi Community Center in Intabazwe, South Africa In May 2016, eight students from the Burnett Honors College traveled to South Africa in order to implement various sustainability projects focused on education, health, and technology, among other concentrations. The South Africa Honors Abroad Program is a collaboration with community partners in South Africa, addressing their specific needs while giving students valuable leadership, fundraising, and service experience. In preparation for this month-long service-learning experience, they raised over $10,000 during the Spring 2016 semester. Once in

South Africa, they traveled to the township of Intabazwe to begin their collaboration with the Nkosinathi Community Center. Students brought $660 worth of donated medical supplies and worked with about 200 locals to educate the community on basic health and hygiene practices. In order to improve sanitation, a greywater drainage pipe was installed. The students raised $250 for supplies and books for the orphanages school, as well as provided about 14 school uniforms to allow older students to attend public school. Another education project implemented was providing Kindles for students to share, servicing about 50 students. This gave them access to books in Zulu as well as English. In order to power the Kindles and the Community Center as a whole, one student installed portable solar panels to expand the centers access to power. One student worked with Dressed in Hope to procure dresses for about 250 young girls. This was foremost a partnership, and in helping to improve sustainability within the township we learned about another culture and formed meaningful bonds with the locals. Approximate impact number(s): Dressed in Hope Project: 250 people/$0; Kindle/Education Project 50 people/$418, health education project 200 people/$100, Project C.U.R.E. supplies 500 people/$660, Portable Solar Panels: $1,177 , School Supplies: $250/50 people, Uniforms: $350/14 people Awards and Scholarship Committee: Roberta Brown Ergle, School of Teaching, Learning, and Leadership Norma Conner, Nursing Jennifer Elliott, Biology Germayne Graham, LEAD Scholars Phyllis Harris, Business Administration Alla Kourova, Modern Languages & Literatures

Stephanie Krick, Public Administration Amanda Lindsay, UCF Arboretum Geraldine Luzincourt, Nursing Stacey Malaret, LEAD Scholars Iryna Malendevych, Criminal Justice Leandra Preston-Sidler, Womens and Gender Studies Kerry Purmensky, Modern Languages & Literatures Terry Thaxton, English Laurie Uttich, English Amy Zeh, Experiential Learning ~ Many thanks to Showcase Committee members, staff in Experiential Learning, faculty members who infuse service-learning into their curriculum, the Faculty Center for Teaching & Learning, and to all the students who have had their lives changed by a service-learning experience and want to tell about it. The showcase committee is grateful to the Student Government Association, The Burnett Honors College, Interdisciplinary Studies, the Colleges of Undergraduate Studies, Education and Human Performance, Graduate Studies, Health & Public Affairs, Nursing, Medicine, Sciences, and Experiential Learning for ongoing support and generous contributions of over $11,000 in scholarship awards for this event.

Some of Our Scholarship Recipients Sample of Posters from the Event Many thanks to all who have participated in Service-Learning Student Showcases at UCF. For more information about this event please contact Experiential Learning at UCF 407-823-2667 or [email protected] Experiential Learning

Recently Viewed Presentations

  • Problem: An Efficient Projection for L1- Regularization Efficient

    Problem: An Efficient Projection for L1- Regularization Efficient

    l. 2. and . l. 1. regularization. Joint Regularization Penalty. How do we penalize solutions that use too many features? Coefficients for. feature 2. Coefficients for. task 2. An l. 1. norm on the maximum absolute values of the coefficients...
  • Treatment of Alcohol Related Liver Disease (ARLD) by

    Treatment of Alcohol Related Liver Disease (ARLD) by

    Note: not all admissions could have a PbR tariff attached. Therefore approximately 10% of admission costs are not accounted for. Poole HFT did not provide HRG data and so no costs are presented. ARLD admission costs in 2015 for the...
  • Darpa Presentation - Carnegie Mellon University

    Darpa Presentation - Carnegie Mellon University

    Even GPS systems run. Webservers. FTP servers. Network time daemons. The picture shows a trimble GPS, a high-end receiver used in cyber-physical systems.
  • Butter - PDST

    Butter - PDST

    Reduced fat dairy spreads. These have only half the fat of butter or margarine Culinary Uses of Butter/Margarine Adds flavour to food e.g. potatoes Prevents food from sticking e.g. sausages on pan Adds moistness to food e.g. bread Shortening agent...
  • Bridging the Gap:Shelter and StorageInformation Session - Seattle

    Bridging the Gap:Shelter and StorageInformation Session - Seattle

    Investment Area and Funding Source. This Bridging the Gap Shelter and Storage RFP is an open and competitive funding process.. Approximately . $1,300,000 . is available through the . Seattle General Fund . to . create up to 100 new...
  • Back to Basics: Notifications

    Back to Basics: Notifications

    Double click on the order itself on the cprs orders tab and in the order details under current status you will see "Order # _____". Entering all three pieces of information here in this parameter will tell you exactly who...
  • Chapter 14 - Chemical Analysis

    Chapter 14 - Chemical Analysis

    Chapter 16 - Chemical Analysis Review of curves of growth The linear part: The width is set by the thermal width Eqw is proportional to abundance The "flat" part: The central depth approaches its maximum value Line strength grows asymptotically...
  • Whats New in Social Studies? August 15, 2013

    Whats New in Social Studies? August 15, 2013

    Then explain your answers using evidence from the letters and your knowledge of history. ... Post test to Achievement Series, run answer forms and tests. Give the test. Gather (scan answer forms) and analyze the data. Meet with teachers to...